THE ROAD RUNNER SHOW


Written by Kevin McCorry
    "If you're on a highway and Road Runner goes beep-beep!
    Just step aside, or you might end up in heap!
    Road Runner, Road Runner runs on the road all day.
    Even the Coyote can't make him change his ways.
    Road Runner, that Coyote's after you!
    Road Runner, if he catches you, you're through!
    Road Runner, that Coyote's after you!
    Road Runner, if he catches you, you're through!
    That Coyote is really a crazy clown!
    When will he learn that he never can mow him down?
    Poor little Road Runner never bothers anyone.
    Just running down the road is his idea of having fun!"
Animated-cartoon director Chuck Jones created the Road Runner, an extremely speedy bird that literally runs on roads in the U.S. southwestern desert, in 1948. Together with writers Tedd Pierce and Michael Maltese, Jones paired the road-running fowl with a hungry coyote, later given the name of Wile E., who has an overweening belief in his own ingenuity and in scientific methods and instruments of ACME Corporation design for use in his constant pursuit of the elusive, fast bird.

Regarded by Jones as a violently comedic parable for the modern conundrum of advanced technology versus an indomitable force of nature, or for a man's quest for the perfect, succulent bird (woman) that is always beyond his reach, Wile E. Coyote's chase of the Road Runner has lasted for a half-century and continues unabated in television reruns of the classic Warner Brothers cartoons.

Wile E. Coyote is every man's failing hero. His facial expressions or proclamations on hand-held signs as one of his schemes is about to go painfully awry are always totally empathetic. He becomes so single-minded, so fixated on his pursuit of Road Runner that he forgets his original, gastronomic intentions and has become determined to catch the Road Runner to preserve what is left of his dignity, and fails constantly to consider Murphy's Law, even as he attempts schemes that by all standards of credibility cannot possibly succeed: trying to fly in a poorly-fitting Superman costume, or encasing himself inside of a steel ball of random trajectory, or fixing an arrowhead onto his nose and sling-shooting himself at the Road Runner, or using a wheeled helmet on a wire to ride upside down off of a cliff. The ACME materials that he utilizes become more and more fantastic, like tornado seeds, earthquake pills, dehydrated boulders, an ice-making machine, and a jet-powered unicycle, and all fail by necessity of their one possible fallibility, which Wile E. never anticipates.

In Jones' Road Runner cartoons, starting with "Fast and Furry-ous" (1948), nothing happens to Wile E. that Wile E. does not initiate. The Road Runner can only harm him after the chase has already begun by suddenly beep-beeping (the Road Runner's one characteristic sound) and startling Wile E. into falling off of a cliff, jumping upward and hitting his head on a rock formation, etc..

Between 1948 and 1964, Jones directed 24 Road Runner cartoons, with "Beep Prepared" (1961) nominated for an Academy Award and with animation for "To Beep or Not to Beep" (1963) used in 1962 for an unsold pilot episode for a prime-time television series, The Adventures of the Road Runner. Jones' final Road Runner cartoon of this time period was "War and Pieces" in 1964. Two further Road Runner cartoon shorts by Jones, "Zip Zip Hooray" and "Road Runner-A-Go-Go", were edited from parts of the unsold pilot episode.

DePatie-Freleng Enterprises was formed in 1964 after the Warner Brothers cartoon studio was closed, and Jones' fellow director of more than 25 years, Friz Freleng, revived the chase by Wile E. Coyote of the Road Runner for an additional series of cartoon shorts, starting with "The Wild Chase" (1965), directed by Freleng and Hawley Pratt, in which Wile E. and Sylvester Cat join mishap-prone forces to pursue the racing Road Runner and Speedy Gonzales. Robert McKimson then directed "Rushing Roulette" (1965), a Road Runner cartoon short almost entirely in the Jones style, with Wile E. attempting and failing to catch the Road Runner by rigging a photograph machine with a cannon, putting all-stick glue on the road, attaching TNT to a piano on which the Road Runner, without ill effects, plays "Those Endearing Young Charms", aiming a solar-ray-magnifying glass at the mirror-holding Road Runner, and releasing a boulder that shears away the base of the narrow mesa atop of which he is standing.

Rudy Larriva at Format Films next directed eleven additional Road Runner cartoons for DePatie-Freleng Enterprises to distribute to Warner Brothers, cartoons in which Wile E.'s schemes involved a chemistry set, a World War I airplane, a huge robot in his likeness, and a hot rod built from junk metal, plus such interesting ploys as an exploding telephone in a phoney bird sanctuary and a lightning rod disguised as a female Road Runner. McKimson followed the Larriva eleven with his second Road Runner cartoon, "Sugar and Spies" (1966), the last theatrical Road Runner film until the release of Jones' "Chariots of Fur" in 1995.

In September, 1966, Wile E. and his elusive, highway-traversing prey appeared on Saturday morning network television in The Road Runner Show.


Episodes of The Road Runner Show were opened and closed with a "groovy" song written by Barbara Cameron and performed by a vocal group, with difficult-to-understand lyrics rather like those on the classic Spiderman television series (1967-70). This was the same song that would be played after "This is it" on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour. With the song, quick cuts from various Road Runner cartoons were shown. Some of the cartoons from which the cuts were extracted were "Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner" (Wile E. fluttering his eyebrows at the camera), "Tired and Feathered" (Wile E. shaking his head to mean "no" and the Road Runner releasing a lever to send Wile E. barreling down a hill on a stone log which crushes him against the rock formation at the base of the hill), "Highway Runnery" (Wile E.'s fan losing power just as he is about to clear a gorge on his wind sail), "Hip- Hip- Hurry!" (Wile E. being startled from behind him and between his legs by the beep-beeping Road Runner; Wile E. trying to sling-shot a dynamite stick, only to have it explode in his face), and "Wild About Hurry" (Wile E.'s rocket colliding with a rock).

Each episode of the 30-minute-long Road Runner Show that aired on CBS from September 10, 1966 to September 7, 1968, started with a Road Runner cartoon, many of which, directed by Larriva or by McKimson, had been completed and distributed to movie theatres just months earlier! Road Runner cartoons on The Road Runner Show were titled on red background, with Wile E. standing to the left of the title and looking schemingly at the Road Runner, who stood to the title's right. The same Road Runner and Wile E. poses were seen during the closing credits of every Road Runner Show. McKimson drew the poses of the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote used for the Road Runner cartoon title cards on The Road Runner Show, which is why Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner on those title cards have a look distinctively recognizable as that in the McKimson-directed cartoons, "Rushing Roulette" and "Sugar and Spies".

The second cartoon was always one from the Tweety Bird and Sylvester Cat series of cartoons. Each Tweety-and-Sylvester cartoon presented on The Road Runner Show was titled with a scene of Sylvester glancing from behind a tree at a running Tweety. McKimson probably was responsible for those title cards, though whether he personally drew them is questionable, because Sylvester in them looks quite like he did in Freleng's cartoons. Someone from the pre-1964 Freleng cartoon-animation unit at Warner Brothers might have provided talents for drawing of the Tweety-and-Sylvester cartoon title card.

Third and last was a cartoon with one or some of the following characters: Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., Hippety Hopper, Speedy Gonzales, Ralph Wolf, Sam Sheepdog, Pepe Le Pew, Foghorn Leghorn, Henery Hawk, Miss Prissy, Elmer Fudd, canines Spike and Chester, the Rum Cake-Eating Mouse, Angelo the Mighty Flea, Bulldog, and Daffy Duck- and titled with a group of five characters (Foghorn Leghorn, Pepe Le Pew, Speedy Gonzales, Yosemite Sam, Elmer Fudd) arranged in a semi-circle. The characters on the title card look like they could have been drawn by McKimson.

The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour (1968-71; 1975-8), CBS' Saturday morning successor to The Road Runner Show, would coopt most of the cartoons on The Road Runner Show, in addition to their title cards.

A sponsor's identification would follow the theme song inaugurating each Road Runner Show, and clusters of commercials were positioned by CBS elsewhere in the episodes.

And brief sequences with the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote, cartoon-animated specially for The Road Runner Show by staff of DePatie-Freleng Enterprises under the direction of McKimson, were inserted between cartoons one and two and between cartoons two and three of each episode. In these interstitial segments, Wile E. uses grenades with a tennis racket, a cannon, a red-nosed, wheeled robot, a rifle tied to a string, a rocket with an unreliable fuse, a Road Runner replica costume, a jet-powered car, a sketch of himself and of the Road Runner on an easel, a boulder dropped from a cliff above a water cooler, dynamite under two manhole covers, a telephone connected by a fuse to a huge TNT stick, a remote-controlled rocket that launches and then descends explosively upon him, and a motorcycle that carries him up a hill to arrive on the bottom side of a pointed cliff, from which he falls, demolishing the motorcycle.

The Road Runner Show was superseded on CBS by The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour on September 14, 1968. The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour would be shown by CBS on Saturday mornings for three consecutive television broadcast years until 1971, when CBS opted to reduce Saturday airtime for Bugs Bunny to a half-hour and waived for awhile the broadcast rights to all of the cartoons that had composed the episodes of The Road Runner Show between 1966 and 1968. The ABC television network promptly acquired The Road Runner Show and all constituent cartoons, and starting in September, 1971, The Road Runner Show was rerun on ABC in a reassembled form, with some trimming to remove Sam Sheepdog and Ralph Wolf respectively smoking pipe and cigarette in "A Sheep in the Deep", the sound of Sylvester slapping his own face in "Snow Business", Foghorn Leghorn's quip about his cupboard being, "Bare as a cooch dancer's midriff," in "Strangled Eggs", and some of the consequences of Wile E. Coyote's failing schemes in the between-cartoon segments. Speculation is that some of these edits were done at some point in time during the 1968-71 CBS broadcast of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour.


"The Wild Chase", with the Road Runner and Speedy Gonzales in competition with each other for claim to being fastest creature of the desert region of North America, "Highway Runnery", a Road Runner cartoon in which one of Wile E. Coyote's schemes to catch the Road Runner results in the hatching of a baby robot clock Road Runner, and "Claws in the Lease", which opens with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr. scrounging for food in a city dump, were among many cartoons that premiered on U.S. network television on The Road Runner Show.

CBS' first episode of The Road Runner Show on September 10, 1966 contained "Zip N' Snort", "Hyde and Go Tweet", and "The Wild Chase". One of the episodes during The Road Runner Show's two years of transmission on CBS consisted of the cartoon shorts, "Sugar and Spies", "A Street Cat Named Sylvester", and "Birds of a Father". And the cartoons in the final Road Runner Show on CBS on September 7, 1968 were "Highway Runnery", "Fowl Weather", and "Don't Axe Me". Many of the cartoons in the first season episodes of The Road Runner Show were having their U.S. network television premieres. This included all of the Road Runner cartoons made after 1959, several late-1950s and all post-1960 Tweety-and-Sylvester cartoons, and a number of Foghorn Leghorn, Speedy Gonzales, Sylvester-without-Tweety, and Elmer Fudd cartoons.


In a between-cartoon gag vignette in some episodes of The Road Runner Show's first two seasons, Wile E. Coyote tries to ride a rocket in pursuit of the Road Runner, but the fuse lit by Wile E. to start the rocket motor causes the rocket to explode.

Cartoons Shown On The Road Runner Show (1966-8)

"Zip N' Snort" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"The Wild Chase" with Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Sylvester, and Speedy Gonzales
"Beep Prepared" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Ready, Set, Zoom!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Zoom at the Top" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"War and Pieces" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"To Beep or Not to Beep" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tired and Feathered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Stop, Look, and Hasten" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Fast and Furry-ous" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Scrambled Aches" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Rushing Roulette" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"There They Go-Go-Go!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Gee Whiz-z-z-z!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Hairied and Hurried" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Whoa Be-Gone!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Hopalong Casualty" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Sugar and Spies" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Boulder Wham!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Going! Going! Gosh!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Shot and Bothered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Out and Out Rout" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"The Solid Tin Coyote" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Lickety-Splat!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Clippety Clobbered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Highway Runnery" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Hyde and Go Tweet" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Putty Tat Trouble" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tweet and Lovely" with Tweety and Sylvester
"The Jet Cage" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Tree Cornered Tweety" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tweet, Tweet, Tweety" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Trick or Tweet" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Dog Pounded" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tweety's Circus" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Ain't She Tweet" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Hawaiian Aye Aye" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"A Bird in a Guilty Cage" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tugboat Granny" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Tweet and Sour" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Catty Cornered" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Rocky
"Gift Wrapped" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"A Bird in a Bonnet" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"A Street Cat Named Sylvester" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and Hector Bulldog
"Tweet Zoo" with Tweety and Sylvester
"A Pizza Tweety Pie" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Trip For Tat" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Muzzle Tough" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Tweet Dreams" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Greedy For Tweety" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Snow Business" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Fowl Weather" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and Hector Bulldog
"Hoppy Daze" with Sylvester and Hippety Hopper
"Pop 'im Pop!" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Fish and Slips" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
"Dr. Jerkyl's Hide" with Sylvester, Spike, and Chester
"Birds of a Father" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
"Mouse-Taken Identity" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Claws in the Lease" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
"The Slap-Hoppy Mouse" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Cannery Woe" with Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester
"Cats and Bruises" with Sylvester and Speedy Gonzales
"Chili Weather" with Sylvester and Speedy Gonzales
"The Dixie Fryer" with Foghorn Leghorn, Pappy, and Elvis
"Weasel While You Work" with Foghorn Leghorn and the Weasel
"Mother Was a Rooster" with Foghorn Leghorn
"Strangled Eggs" with Foghorn Leghorn, Henery Hawk, and Miss Prissy
"The Slick Chick" with Foghorn Leghorn
"Wild Over You" with Pepe Le Pew
"Touche and Go" with Pepe Le Pew
"A Mutt in a Rut" with Elmer Fudd and Rover the Dog
"What's My Lion?" with Elmer Fudd and Rocky the Mountain Lion
"Don't Axe Me" with Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, and Mrs. Fudd
"A Sheep in the Deep" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"Woolen Under Where" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"The Mouse On 57th Street" with the Rum Cake-Eating Mouse
"To Itch His Own" with Angelo the Mighty Flea and Bulldog

Below is an episode guide for The Road Runner Show as assembled for telecast on ABC in 1971-2.


In one of the between-cartoon gag vignettes of installment seven of The Road Runner Show- Season 3, Wile E. Coyote rides a motorcycle in his chase of the Road Runner, both characters eventually coming to a stop on the bottom side of a pointed cliff. Needless to say, it is Wile E.- and motorcycle- that plummet to the ground many, many feet below the cliff.
Season 3 

Road Runner Show # 1 (Sept. 4, 1971)
Cannons, a hand grenade in a toy airplane, and axle grease applied to feet are some of the failed props in Wile E. 
Coyote's schemes to procure Road Runner meat. He also joins Sylvester in a chase of both the Road Runner and Speedy 
Gonzales while the two rapid denizens of the desert are racing each other.
"Zip N' Snort" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"The Jet Cage" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"The Wild Chase" with Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Sylvester, and Speedy Gonzales

Road Runner Show # 2 (Sept. 11, 1971)
Wile E. Coyote's items of unsuccessful use: an extended tripping foot, a portable hole, a magnet, and a rocket sled on a
railroad track. Sylvester and another cat fight to have claim of Tweety for lunch on a winter day, and Sylvester disrupts
Speedy's celebration of Cinco de Mayo.
"Beep Prepared" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Putty Tat Trouble" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Cats and Bruises" with Sylvester and Speedy Gonzales

Road Runner Show # 3 (Sept. 18, 1971)
Glue on the road, a dynamite stick, a 10,000 pound weight, a giant rubber band, and a female road runner costume are all
painfully ineffective for Wile E. Coyote, Sylvester is startled to repeatedly find a huge Mr. Hyde bird in the place of 
tiny Tweety, and amid ice and snow does Foghorn Leghorn direct a hungry weasel toward the barnyard dog.
"Ready, Set, Zoom!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Hyde and Go Tweet" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Weasel While You Work" with Foghorn Leghorn and the Weasel

Road Runner Show # 4 (Sept. 25, 1971)
Failures for Wile E. Coyote are the result of an ice-maker machine, a bear trap, and a boomerang, Sylvester's Tweety-hunt
brings him to a city automat, into a mine field, and onto a wooden bridge in Colorado, and Sylvester almost does not 
endure a confrontation with Hippety Hopper in a pier warehouse.
"Zoom at the Top" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tree Cornered Tweety" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Hoppy Daze" with Sylvester and Hippety Hopper

Road Runner Show # 5 (Oct. 2, 1971)
A thrown hand grenade is ricocheted into Wile E. Coyote's face by a cactus, Wile E.'s invisible paint does not protect 
him from being struck by a beep-beeping truck, the Road Runner cannot be reached atop a cliff, and a misfired rocket sends
Wile E. through the Earth to the Orient. A lion and a sheepdog respectively thwart Sylvester and Ralph Wolf's quest for
sustenance.
"War and Pieces" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tweety's Circus" with Tweety and Sylvester
"A Sheep in the Deep" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog

Road Runner Show # 6 (Oct. 9, 1971)
No matter where Wile E. Coyote positions himself, his catapult drops a boulder on top of him. Sylvester and a feline 
friend strive not to allow rivalry for grabbing pole-top-nested Tweety to undermine their amicable relationship. Sylvester
discovers that his son's best pal is a bird.
"To Beep or Not to Beep" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Trick or Tweet" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Birds of a Father" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.

Road Runner Show # 7 (Oct. 16, 1971)
Wile E. Coyote's huge coyote robot is an unmitigated disaster, as is Sylvester's chase of Tweety in his own winter 
quarters, and Foghorn Leghorn combats two Southern chicken hawks.
"The Solid Tin Coyote" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"A Street Cat Named Sylvester" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and Hector Bulldog
"The Dixie Fryer" with Foghorn Leghorn, Pappy, and Elvis

Road Runner Show # 8 (Oct. 23, 1971)
A clay chicken is no contest as a succulent meal against a Road Runner, but Wile E. Coyote cannot attain the speed of the
road-blazing force of nature. Nor can Sylvester access Tweety in the midst of a dog pound, and likewise is Ralph Wolf 
unable to attain mutton by grabbing one of Sam Sheepdog's lambs.
"There They Go-Go-Go!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Dog Pounded" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Woolen Under Where" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog

Road Runner Show # 9 (Oct. 30, 1971)
Dehydrated boulders, a Mr. Hyde cat and fly, and a shark living in an underwater dog house are among the contents of this
installment.
"Scrambled Aches" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Hawaiian Aye Aye" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Dr. Jerkyl's Hide" with Sylvester, Spike, and Chester

Road Runner Show # 10 (Nov. 6, 1971)
Can a spy kit aid Wile E. Coyote in catching his Road Runner quarry? No more than Sylvester can stop Speedy Gonzales from
raiding a cheese store. No more than Tweety can be grasped from his display cage inside of a department store.
"Sugar and Spies" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"A Bird in a Guilty Cage" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Cannery Woe" with Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester

Road Runner Show # 11 (Nov. 13, 1971)
Trampolines do not break a coyote's fall from a 100-foot cliff, ACME tornado seeds should not be placed beneath a faulty
water pistol, and Sylvester ought not to try to filch Tweety from a National Park.
"Whoa Be-Gone!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tweet, Tweet, Tweety" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Don't Axe Me" with Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, and Mrs. Fudd

Road Runner Show # 12 (Nov. 20, 1971)
Baby kangaroo escapes from circus, Sylvester and Tweety are in hospital with broken legs, and Wile E. Coyote is owner of a
chemistry set. 
"Clippety Clobbered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Greedy For Tweety" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Pop 'im Pop!" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper

Road Runner Show # 13 (Nov. 27, 1971)
Earthquakes, a chemically concocted thunderstorm, and a wildcat equal a volatile installment.
"Hopalong Casualty" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tweet and Lovely" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Wild Over You" with Pepe Le Pew

Road Runner Show # 14 (Dec. 4, 1971)
For this episode, tornadoes, a sky-diving Coyote and a parachutist putty tat, and a maternal rooster are the 
distinguishing elements.
"Hairied and Hurried" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tugboat Granny" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Mother Was a Rooster" with Foghorn Leghorn

Road Runner Show # 15 (Dec. 11, 1971)
Roller skis, a slingshot, exploding darts, and a boomerang do not yield Road Runner fricassee for a hungry Wile E. Coyote,
and Sylvester must act as protector to Tweety lest he become violin strings as per Granny's decree. A fishing expedition
reveals another of Sylvester's shortcomings.
"Lickety-Splat!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tweet and Sour" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Fish and Slips" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.

Road Runner Show # 16 (Dec. 18, 1971)
Wile E. Coyote's bogus bird sanctuary, a telephone booth with a dynamite fuse, does not end the Road Runner's trail-
blazing ways, Tweety finds shelter from Sylvester in a chicken coop, and Elmer Fudd's faithful dog wrongly believes that
Elmer intends his demise. 
"Tired and Feathered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Fowl Weather" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and Hector Bulldog
"A Mutt in a Rut" with Elmer Fudd and Rover the Dog

Road Runner Show # 17 (Dec. 25, 1971)
It is Christmas at Granny's house. Wile E. Coyote continues his futile chase, this time with such schemes as a painted 
road at the edge of a cliff, dynamite fastened to an arrow, quick-drying cement, a boulder, and an anvil released from a 
street-cleaner wagon underneath a balloon.
"Going! Going! Gosh!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Gift Wrapped" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Mouse-Taken Identity" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper

Road Runner Show # 18 (Jan. 1, 1972)
AJAX Stix-All glue presents a problem for Wile E. Coyote when the Road Runner runs straight through a piece of road 
covered by it and Wile E. then himself tests the extreme stickiness of the adhesive, the cannon in a trick photograph 
booth actually snapshoots the Road Runner but blasts Wile E., and Sylvester cannot penetrate the bulldog-filled yard 
surrounding Granny and Tweety's domicile.
"Rushing Roulette" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Ain't She Tweet" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"The Mouse On 57th Street" with the Rum Cake-Eating Mouse

Road Runner Show # 19 (Jan. 8, 1972)
Wile E. Coyote's Burmese tiger trap, intended to capture the Road Runner, spawns a real tiger, Sylvester rescues Tweety 
from a hostage situation but cannot eat the canary because he has been declared a hero, and Speedy enters into a food 
processing factory to obtain nourishment for his friends and finds guard-cat Sylvester waiting for him inside the 
establishment.
"Stop, Look, and Hasten" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Catty Cornered" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Rocky
"Chili Weather" with Sylvester and Speedy Gonzales

Road Runner Show # 20 (Jan. 15, 1972)
Wile E. Coyote learns that it is unwise to chase the Road Runner around an old jalopy, an Italiano putty tat is all wet- 
not to mention concussed and swallowed by a shark- after attempting to capture Tweety in Venice, and Foghorn Leghorn is 
unable to destroy Miss Prissy's adopted son, Henery Hawk.
"Highway Runnery" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"A Pizza Tweety Pie" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Strangled Eggs" with Foghorn Leghorn, Henery Hawk, and Miss Prissy

Road Runner Show # 21 (Jan. 22, 1972)
Tweety and Sylvester are globetrotters, Elmer Fudd prepares to hunt mountain lion, and Wile E. tries without avail to
swoop downward in a flying Batman costume upon the Road Runner.
"Gee Whiz-z-z-z!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Trip For Tat" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"What's My Lion?" with Elmer Fudd and Rocky the Mountain Lion

Road Runner Show # 22 (Jan. 29, 1972)
Wile E. Coyote inflates himself with helium in a misbegotten plot to bomb the Road Runner from high above the desert
roads. Sylvester, disguised as a female dog, attracts the amorous attention of a bulldog guarding Tweety and Granny's city
home. And lastly is a Pepe Le Pew cartoon set in southern France, with the usual chase by Pepe of an accidentally skunk-
striped cat, whom Pepe desires to woo.
"Shot and Bothered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Muzzle Tough" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Touche and Go" with Pepe Le Pew

Road Runner Show # 23 (Feb. 5, 1972)
Rocket-powered sneakers do not enable Wile E. Coyote to catch the Road Runner on a complicated cloverleaf highway, and 
feisty ladies prevent Sylvester from feasting on Tweety and joining his son in a comfortable abode.
"Fast and Furry-ous" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"A Bird in a Bonnet" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Claws in the Lease" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.

Road Runner Show # 24 (Feb. 12, 1972)
How does a Coyote attain the ability to fly? Perhaps instead of tying doves to his feet, he should consult Sylvester's 
psychiatrist, who after listening to Sylvester's woeful story of frustration in chasing Tweety, flaps his arms and 
aerially departs his high-rise office. Foghorn Leghorn learns that it is unwise to volunteer as caretaker for a trouble-
making boy chick.
"Out and Out Rout" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tweet Dreams" with Tweety and Sylvester
"The Slick Chick" with Foghorn Leghorn

Road Runner Show # 25 (Feb. 19, 1972)
Indian rain dancing, Tweety singing in a paper ship within Sylvester's stove pot, and a muscular flea vanquishing a 
bulldog are unlikely scenarios of this strange show.
"Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Snow Business" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"To Itch His Own" with Angelo the Mighty Flea and Bulldog

Road Runner Show # 26 (Feb. 26, 1972)
Attaining the unattainable at its most hazardous: Wile E. Coyote attempting to bridge the gap between two steep cliffs to
reach the Road Runner on the other side of the chasm. Sylvester pursues Tweety in a zoo and combats Hippety Hopper in a 
dilapidated house.
"Boulder Wham!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tweet Zoo" with Tweety and Sylvester
"The Slap-Hoppy Mouse" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper

From 1997 to 2003, The Road Runner Show was intermittently presented in Canada on the Teletoon cable television specialty channel. It was the third season (i.e. the ABC version) that Teletoon aired, after having converted all episodes to digital videotape, with rather mixed results in terms of picture quality and glitches in the digitizing process. Audio and video were out of synchronization during some of the between-cartoon Road Runner and Coyote gags, especially those in Show 2. And after but one Teletoon broadcast, Show 13 vanished from the sequence, though its Road Runner cartoon, "Hopalong Casualty", continued to surface on Teletoon-French in the Canadian province of Quebec.

Bonus material on LOONEY TUNES GOLDEN COLLECTION digital videodiscs (DVDs) has so far not included the opening, closing credits, and between-cartoon gag segments of The Road Runner Show.

IN MEMORIAM

Cartoon directors Friz Freleng, Chuck Jones, and Robert McKimson
Voice characterization performers Mel Blanc, Daws Butler, Hal Smith, and Bea Benaderet
Musicians Carl W. Stalling, Milt Franklyn, John Seely, Bill Lava, and Walter Greene


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