THE BUGS BUNNY/ROAD RUNNER HOUR


Written by Kevin McCorry
    "The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour."
    (curtain rises)
    "Overture, curtain, lights!
    This is it. The night of nights.
    No more rehearsing or nursing a part.
    We know every part by heart!
    (cane flip)
    Overture, curtain, lights!
    This is it. We'll hit the heights!
    And oh, what heights we'll hit!
    On with the show, this is it!
    (character procession)
    Tonight what heights we'll hit!
    On with the show, this is it!"
    "Starring the Oscar-winning rabbit, Bugs Bunny."
    "And also starring my fast-feathered friend, the Road Runner!"
    (Road Runner zips forward on film projector screen)
    "Beep, beep!"
    "Road Runner, that Coyote's after you!
    Road Runner, if he catches you, you're through!
    Road Runner, that Coyote's after you!
    Road Runner, if he catches you, you're through!
    That Coyote is really a crazy clown!
    When will he learn that he never can slow him down?
    Poor little Road Runner never bothers anyone.
    Just running down the road is his idea of having fun!"
    "Beep, beep!"
    "The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour."
Warner Brothers' cartoons (with Bugs Bunny, the Road Runner, Daffy Duck, Tweety Bird, Sylvester Cat, Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam, Wile E. Coyote, Foghorn Leghorn, Porky Pig, Pepe Le Pew, Speedy Gonzales, and other highly enjoyable personages) received their best U.S. network television treatment on CBS' The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour.

Although classic Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons first aired on U.S. prime-time network television in 1960-2 on The Bugs Bunny Show, each of the 52 installments of that television series was only a half-hour long. Only three theatrical cartoons were in each installment, and some were seen twice over the television show's two-year run. For each episode, Warner Brothers' cartoon animation directors Friz Freleng, Chuck Jones, and Robert McKimson created new sequences to bridge the transition between cartoons. Bugs Bunny and the above-mentioned other characters appeared as "showmen" on a stage in these interstitial sequences, often with Bugs lecturing on such subjects as dogs, cats, birds, men, and crime, using footage from classic theatrical cartoons to illustrate his comments.

CBS' The Road Runner Show, also of a 30-minute length, premiered on September 10, 1966 and was telecast for two years until September 7, 1968. Its episodes consisted of three cartoons, one with the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote, one with Tweety and Sylvester, and one with a rather eclectic selection of Warner Brothers cartoon characters.

In 1968, when CBS acquired the U.S. network broadcast rights to Bugs Bunny's television show, it decided to merge the two television programs into one, and The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was born. For the opening to The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, the "This is it" song from The Bugs Bunny Show, performed by Bugs and Daffy and written by Jerry Livingston and Mack David, was joined by most of the song written by Barbara Cameron for The Road Runner Show. Stage scenes from The Bugs Bunny Show, with Bugs and the other characters, introduced some of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour cartoons- and between-cartoon gag vignettes with the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote, cartoon-animated at DePatie-Freleng Enterprises under the direction of Robert McKimson specially for The Road Runner Show, were also coopted into this newfangled cartoon assembly television series.



The initial season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, transmitted on CBS on Saturdays at 9:30 A.M. Atlantic Time, was the definitive one. Many of the cartoon shorts that would be staples of Saturday morning cartoon viewing for more than 20 years, appeared on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour in its earliest season.

The first season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour premiered on CBS on September 14, 1968 and ran for 26 weeks until March 8, 1969, and the same episodic sequence was rerun from March 15, 1969 to September 6, 1969. This initial season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was then released into syndication and made available in other countries. Canada's CBC television network purchased the rights to broadcast Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1 in 1969 and ran these 26 hour-long installments on a national, full-network basis on Saturday late afternoons/early evenings, year after year, until September, 1975. Then, the Global television network in central and western Canada aired these 26 installments continually at a late afternoon airtime, first on Saturdays, then in later years on Sundays, until the early 1980s.

Between 1969 and 1973, while The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was on the CBC, it was usually seen at either 5 or 5:30 P.M. Atlantic Time. Occasionally, special programming (live-telecast sports, political events, etc.) late in the afternoon could result in The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour being scheduled at an earlier than normal time or could cause an outright preemption of Bugs and the Road Runner. From 1973 to 1975, in autumn, winter, and early spring, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour tended to be shown at 6 P.M. Atlantic Time, though in summer, it hopscotched around the afternoon schedule, sometimes shown at 5 P.M., or at 4:30, or at 4, depending on live sports broadcasts. Prior to 1973, it was scheduled immediately after baseball or football games, which were only allotted a scheduled airtime of two and a half hours and almost always exceeded that length, cutting into The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, which was joined already in progress. On some weeks, more than half of an installment was missed. In September, 1973, the CBC decided to schedule an hour's worth of other programming at 5 P.M., between sports and The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, so that Bugs Bunny could be depended upon to start his television show on time, at 6 P.M., with no unseemly disruptions. On weeks when golf or some other late-afternoon sport was shown, the CBC obligingly moved Bugs' television show ahead an hour or two to air in its entirety before the sport broadcast.


As the tasked leader of Roman soldiers, Yosemite Sam angers a multitude of Colosseum lions during his chase of Bugs Bunny, whom he wishes to capture to be the arena victim of the lions.

The CBC stopped its broadcasts of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour on August 30, 1975 and issued an announcement to this effect during the closing credits of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour installment 25, which aired on that day. The Global network promptly acquired the television show and began broadcasting it in the same Saturday airtime.

Each of the 26 syndicated episodes of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour started as they originally did on CBS in 1968-9, with Bugs and Daffy singing "This is it" and a procession of cartoon celebrities marching across a stage. The procession consisted of Tweety, Speedy Gonzales, Hippety Hopper, Yosemite Sam, Sylvester, Elmer Fudd, Pepe Le Pew, Wile E. Coyote, and Foghorn Leghorn. After this, Bugs was introduced as, "...the Oscar-winning rabbit," who then introduced his "co-star", "...my fast-feathered friend, the Road Runner." The classic song from The Road Runner Show then played, accompanied by clips from various Road Runner cartoons.


Title cards for some of the cartoons featured in various episodes of the first season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour.

Following this, the first cartoon feature began, sometimes preceded by brief stage interaction between Bugs and Daffy, or between the special emcee for the particular episode and his usual foe.

Seven cartoon features, 6 to 7 minutes in length, composed each hour-long installment. The cartoons started with a stylized card, showing the title and the regular "star" characters featured in the particular cartoon. For several of Bugs' cartoons, he was posed next to the title, dressed in his emcee "suit", with the Road Runner standing beside him, and with the familiar stage backdrop and a theatrical spotlight on the title, which was printed in Dom Casual font. And for many other Bugs Bunny cartoons titled also on stage with spotlight and with title printing in Dom Casual font, Bugs posed solo. No Road Runner.

In the titles for his cartoons with Yosemite Sam, with exception of the title cards for "Bunker Hill Bunny", "Lighter Than Hare", "14 Carrot Rabbit", "The Fair-Haired Hare", and "Rabbit Every Monday", Bugs was posed with Sam looking up at him menacingly, and the title shown beside them on stage shone upon by the spotlight. For the Tasmanian Devil cartoons with Bugs, a similar duo pose was seen. For some cartoons that featured none of the regular characters (e.g. "One Froggy Evening", "Mouse Wreckers", "Terrier Stricken", "Two's a Crowd", and "Cheese it- the Cat!"), the title card showed Bugs and the Road Runner standing alongside the lighted title.

Most cartoons featuring Sylvester and Tweety had their titles accompanied by a scene of Sylvester peeking from around a tree and Tweety fleeing on some grass to the right of the tree. "Tweet, Tweet, Tweety", "Ain't She Tweet", "Fowl Weather", "Gift Wrapped", "A Bird in a Bonnet", "Catty Cornered", "Tweet and Sour", "Muzzle Tough", "Tweet Zoo", "The Jet Cage", "Putty Tat Trouble", "Tweet and Lovely", "Tree Cornered Tweety", "Tugboat Granny", "Snow Business", "A Bird in a Guilty Cage", "Hawaiian Aye Aye", "Tweety's Circus", "Hyde and Go Tweet", and "A Street Cat Named Sylvester" were all titled in this way. Other cartoons with Sylvester and Tweety (e.g. "Tweety's S.O.S.", "All Abir-r-rd", "Canary Row", "Sandy Claws", and "Tweety and the Beanstalk") were titled with them on stage and Sylvester salivating while holding Tweety in his hand. However, the title card for "Home Tweet Home" showed Bugs and the Road Runner, not Sylvester and Tweety.

Cartoons featuring Sylvester without Tweety (i.e. Sylvester with Sylvester Jr., Hippety Hopper, Elmer Fudd, etc.) tended to be titled with Sylvester posed on stage next to the spotlit title, and for "Claws For Alarm", the title card showed Sylvester together with Porky Pig on stage. The Sylvester-on-stage cartoon titling system had several notable exceptions, in that several cartoon shorts, including many with Sylvester, some with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog, and most with Foghorn Leghorn, or with Speedy Gonzales, or with Pepe Le Pew, were titled beneath the faces of five characters (Foghorn Leghorn, Pepe Le Pew, Speedy Gonzales, Yosemite Sam, and Elmer Fudd) arranged in a semi-circle, even if none of those characters were in the cartoon (e.g. Sylvester's battle against his son's avian chum, "Birds of a Father", the Sylvester/Hippety Hopper cartoons, "Mouse-Taken Identity", "The Slap-Hoppy Mouse", "Hoppy Daze", and "Pop 'im Pop!", the Sylvester/Spike/Chester cartoon short, "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide", and Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog's "A Sheep in the Deep" and "Woolen Under Where"). Some cartoons had no title cards, among them "Fish and Slips", "Trick or Tweet", "A Pizza Tweety Pie", "Trip For Tat", "Dog Pounded", and "Greedy For Tweety", all of which did have title cards when they were included in The Road Runner Show. "Now Hare This" was also untitled on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour until it reappeared on CBS in the late 1970s with a blue title card minus character pose.

Road Runner cartoons, except for "The Wild Chase", were titled on red background and had Wile E. to the left of the title and looking schemingly at the Road Runner on the right side.

Every installment had an approximate half-time television station identification interval. After the third of the three featured cartoons comprising the first approximate half-hour, Bugs would be shown on stage saying, "Eh, I'll tell ya what's up, doc." The Road Runner then zips past Bugs and goes behind Bugs' back, and Wile E. Coyote next comes into view on stage in chase of the Road Runner, who, still behind Bugs and unseen by Wile E., passes a stick of dynamite to his pursuer. Wile E., dynamite in hands, then would rush off of stage, and a huge, stage-shaking explosion would occur from the same off-stage area to which Wile E. had run. The Road Runner would then beep-beep and speedily dash off of stage, and Bugs, looking to camera, would follow with, "Like the boid says," before stopping to allow the announcer to complete the sentence with, "Stay tuned for the second part of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour." After television station identification would be the return for part two with a scene showing the procession of characters again marching across the stage (the Road Runner among the marching characters this time), and then with Wile E. once again chasing the Road Runner on same stage, the Road Runner sprightfully hiding behind Bugs from Wile E.'s sight and grasp, and the adversarial pair (the Road Runner and Wile E.) conflating in a kerfuffle that includes the overcome, non-combative rabbit. Dust rises to reveal Bugs and Wile E. on the stage floor, while the Road Runner runs off of stage to activate some lights. And thereafter would commence the first cartoon of part two, which would contain the final four featured cartoons.

The closing credits to each episode began with Bugs driving a tiny car and tooting its horn at Wile E., who fires himself and a cannonball through a futuristic slingshot and collides with and demolishes Bugs' car. The Road Runner runs past the dazed Bugs and Wile E. while Bugs honks the horn of his wrecked automotive vehicle. A full credit listing followed this. McKimson directed all of the new cartoon animation for the television show, for which he received direction billing above Freleng and Jones, and designed and in most cases personally drew all of the title cards with character poses. The credited producers were William L. Hendricks, Peter Morales, and Andrew Stein of Warner Brothers-Seven Arts Incorporated, the assigned name to Warner Brothers' movie and television production facilities from 1967 to 1972.


More cartoon title cards from various episodes of the first Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour season.

The musical phrase utilized for all of the titles of all Bugs Bunny cartoon shorts, the Tweety-and-Sylvester cartoons with them posed on stage and Sylvester holding Tweety in his hand, and most cartoons with characters other than the regulars, went as follows:

    "Da-da-da... da-da. Da-da-da... da-da. Da-da-da-da-da-da. Da."
This was also the musical accompaniment used from 1985 to 1989 for titles of all cartoons on the ABC television network's Bugs Bunny/Looney Tunes Comedy Hour and Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show.

Music with the tree-oriented title cards of Tweety-and-Sylvester cartoons, all cartoons titled with the semi-circle of Foghorn, Pepe, Speedy, Yosemite Sam, and Elmer, and all Road Runner cartoons, was a variation on the phrase opening the original theatrical Looney Tunes from the 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s, combined with the closing motif from post-1964 cartoon shorts. First used for cartoons shown on The Road Runner Show, it sounded like this:

    "Da. Da-da-da... da-da... da. Da. Da-da-da... da-da-da. DAAA! Da."


One of the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour between-cartoon gag vignettes involving the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote ended with Wile E.'s head becoming lodged inside the jug of a water cooler.

The following is an episode guide for the initial season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour that first aired on CBS in 1968-9 and was run year after year in Canada through the 1970s and into the 1980s.


Title card for the third cartoon of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour first season installment number six.
Season 1
With all of the flourishes mentioned above, such as the "This is it" song beginning each installment, the on-stage character interaction before cartoons, the between-cartoon-feature Road Runner and Coyote segments, the Bugs Bunny, Road Runner, and Wile E. Coyote on-stage conflation always initiating part two, and the episode-ending scene of Bugs in the tiny car and Wile E. with the elaborate slingshot apparatus, Season 1 of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour defined itself in its first episodes as the best conceivable amalgamation of its predecessors, The Bugs Bunny Show and The Road Runner Show. And through this 26-installment season, there are many intriguing facets to its construction. Foghorn Leghorn would be in cartoons in five consecutive episodes, then vanish outside of his march across stage with other characters, have no presence in Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour cartoon features for two months, before another successive five episodes in which his cartoons would be included. Part two's second cartoon was a Tweety-and-Sylvester for several installments in a row in January and February, and each time following a Bugs Bunny outing that was first featured cartoon in part two. For two consecutive episodes near season's end, a Sylvester cartoon with Sylvester Jr. and "giant mouse" Hippety Hopper was third cartoon of part two. And toward the end of the season, the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote were rather at home at cartoon number seven of the episodes. Appearances of Daffy Duck, rather infrequent apart, of course, from his singing with Bugs of "This is it", were clustered in consecutive episodes in rather the same way as were Foghorn Leghorn's cartoons. And Pepe Le Pew's scarce manifestations in cartoons in this television series happened to be in two episodes, one after the other, by way of his own cartoon, "Touche and Go", in Show 9 and his cameo part in Tweety and Sylvester's "Dog Pounded" of Show 10.

Yes, the initial season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour is quite interesting in the way that its content cartoons were arranged in its 26 installments. And this is not only with regard to character appearances. Whether or not the compilers of Season 1 of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour deliberately placed cartoons with similar elements in same or consecutive episodes, close examination of the cartoons in each of the 26 installments of the initial Bugs Bunny/Road Runner season yields some compelling observations on the cartoon-positioning work of the production team for this television classic. The following is an episode-by-episode analysis of the 1968-9 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour season, with comment on notions, motifs, or gags shared by cartoons in same episodes or in preceding or following ones.


"My Bunny Lies Over the Sea", "Tweety's S.O.S.", and "Bedevilled Rabbit", cartoon shorts whose transpired events are situated in foreign lands or on the high seas, were among the seven featured cartoons in Show 1 of Season 1 of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour.

Show 1 contained "My Bunny Lies Over the Sea", "Tweety's S.O.S.", "I Gopher You", "The Solid Tin Coyote", "Bedevilled Rabbit", "Tweet, Tweet, Tweety", and "Hopalong Casualty". "My Bunny Lies Over the Sea" refers to a sea in its title, and a transoceanic journey is implied in Bugs' arrival in Scotland. Correspondingly, the events of "Tweety's S.O.S." transpire on a passenger ship! Further, there is predominantly red plaid dressing to furnishings in Granny and Tweety's cabin on the passenger ship, connecting as imagery with a particular clothing taste of the people of the land visited by Bugs in this episode's first cartoon feature. And Sylvester's shutterbug disguise in "Tweet, Tweet, Tweety" includes a red plaid cap. Red is quite the outstanding color of "I Gopher You", for much of the food processing equipment is red, as too are the food collection trucks and the tomato on the can in which one of the Goofy Gophers is sealed. Sylvester's seasick condition in "Tweety's S.O.S." causes him to pivot to and fro with nausea rather like the Goofy Gopher who falls into a pickling vat does in his intoxicated condition in "I Gopher You". A machine motif connects the food processing factory of "I Gopher You" with the robot built by Wile E. Coyote in "The Solid Tin Coyote". "Bedevilled Rabbit" shows the rampaging Tasmanian Devil shearing through trees. When Bugs stops him as he is in the process of cutting through the trunk of a tree, the tree sandwiches him between its trunk and remaining body. Same happens to Sylvester in "Tweet, Tweet, Tweety" when he tries to chop through the trunk of a tree. The Goofy Gophers in "I Gopher You" are deluged with water mechanically released from a tap, and Tweety uses a water flow control knob to "save" Sylvester from a waterfall in "Tweet, Tweet, Tweety". Volatile substances are swallowed by Sylvester in "Tweety's S.O.S." and by Wile E. Coyote in "Hopalong Casualty".


"All Abir-r-rd", "Duck! Rabbit! Duck!", and "Bunker Hill Bunny", three of the seven cartoons of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 2, set Sylvester's chase of Tweety on a train, Daffy Duck's routine scheming against Bugs Bunny in a snowy woodland, and Bugs' usual battle with Yosemite Sam during the American Revolutionary War.

Show 2 included "All Abir-r-rd", "Duck! Rabbit! Duck!", "To Beep or Not to Beep", "Bunker Hill Bunny", "Shot and Bothered", "Barbary Coast Bunny", and "Birds of a Father". The chase in Show 1's "Tweety's S.O.S." causes Sylvester to run into the furnace powering the passenger ship. In Show 2's "All Abir-r-rd", Sylvester is thrown forward into a railway train's engine when Tweety causes the train to abruptly stop. In both cases, Sylvester's backside is ablaze from his exposure to fire. "Bunker Hill Bunny" and "Birds of a Father" both involve an explosives shed. (Yosemite) Sam Von Schamm the Hessian tunnels into one, and Sylvester seeks refuge in one from his out-of-control miniature airplane. Sylvester's use of mechanization in "Birds of a Father" aptly follows the machinery misadventure of the Goofy Gophers in Show 1's "I Gopher You" and Wile E Coyote's robot in Show 1's "The Solid Tin Coyote". The playing of poker in "Barbary Coast Bunny" is reminiscent of the scene in Show 1's "My Bunny Lies Over the Sea" in which Bugs suggests that he and Scotsman McCrory play cards. "Bunker Hill Bunny" and "Barbary Coast Bunny" are cartoons depicting pre-twentieth-century America. Respective collision with trash can and manhole covers results in an "accordion-head" for Sylvester in "All Abir-r-rd" and for Sir Pantsalot of Dropseat Manor in Show 3's "Knights Must Fall".


"What's Up, Doc?", "Canary Row", and "You Were Never Duckier" were three of the seven cartoons of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 3. Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd perform Vaudeville, Sylvester stalks Tweety in a city that could be San Francisco, and Daffy tries to win a $5,000 prize for best rooster.

Show 3 featured "What's Up, Doc?", "Don't Axe Me", "Stop, Look, and Hasten", "Canary Row", "You Were Never Duckier", "Knights Must Fall", and "Red Riding Hoodwinked". "Canary Row" ends with Sylvester fleeing electrocution on a power wire by a streetcar. Streetcars are most commonly associated with San Francisco, which, in its 1880s time period, is the setting of "Barbary Coast Bunny" in Show 2. Streetcars move along railroad tracks, a fact notable because Show 2's "All Abir-r-rd" occurs on a train. Moreover, Bugs is shown alone in a train's baggage car, deciding to change his vaudeville act with Elmer Fudd, in a scene in Show 3's "What's Up, Doc?". "Stop, Look, and Hasten" also contains a scene with a train. Marquee of a theatre is a shared motif of "What's Up, Doc?" and "You Were Never Duckier". Granny, with Tweety beside her, is at the controls of public transit vehicles at the end of both "Canary Row" and "Red Riding Hoodwinked".

Show 4 contained "Shiskabugs", "Beep Prepared", "Mouse-Taken Identity", "A Fractured Leghorn", "Prince Violent", "Ain't She Tweet", and "Fast and Furry-ous". "Shiskabugs" has Yosemite Sam attempting to cook Bugs in an oven, which parallels the plight of Daffy in George K. Chickenhawk's home in Show 3's "You Were Never Duckier". "Shiskabugs" and "Prince Violent", plus Show 3's "Knights Must Fall", are all set in England during the time of castles, knights, and absolute monarchs. Sylvester crashes into a knight's armor in the museum in which he and his son, Sylvester Jr., are chasing mice in "Mouse-Taken Identity". The jet-powered bat-wing contraption worn by Wile E. Coyote in "Beep Prepared" may be seen as correspondent to the Batman suit in which Wile E. will dress himself in Show 5's "Gee Whiz-z-z-z!". Said two Road Runner cartoons will be in consecutive episodes again later this Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour season, Shows 22 and 23 to be precise.

Show 5's cartoons were "Lovelorn Leghorn", "Gee Whiz-z-z-z!", "Bill of Hare", "Fish and Slips", "Hare We Go", "Trick or Tweet", and "Hare-Way to the Stars". A pier is shown in "Bill of Hare", "Fish and Slips", and "Hare We Go". Show 4's "A Fractured Leghorn" involves a feline fishing endeavor, as does Show 5's "Fish and Slips"! Sylvester Jr. also meets a worm in "Fish and Slips", and the story in "A Fractured Leghorn" in Show 4 is predicated on Foghorn Leghorn and a cat vying for possession of a worm. "Gee Whiz-z-z-z!" has a Batman costume gag that accords with a similar one in "Trick or Tweet", and these sequences echo the Superman costume attempted by Wile E. in Show 4's "Fast and Furry-ous". "Hare We Go" is a cartoon with a pre-modern time-period-locale, as are Show 4's "Shiskabugs" and "Prince Violent" and Show 6's "Knighty Knight Bugs". Seagoing vessels are elements of "Bill of Hare" and "Hare We Go". A shark is traumatized by the Tasmanian Devil in "Bill of Hare", and Sylvester encounters ferocious fish in the aquarium setting of "Fish and Slips". Further noteworthy is that Show 5, with Bugs Bunny joining Chris Columbus for a trans-oceanic journey in 1492 in "Hare We Go", was rather appropriate for Columbus Day weekend on October 12, 1968.


Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 6 had such outstanding cartoon features as "Zip N' Snort", "One Froggy Evening", and "Wild and Woolly Hare". "Zip N' Snort", with Wile E. Coyote applying axle grease to his feet to try to catch the Road Runner, is one of the funniest Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoons. "One Froggy Evening" is considered by many animated-cartoon aficionados to be one of the best cartoons ever made. And "Wild and Woolly Hare" offers perhaps the quintessential Wild West confrontation of Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam.

Show 6 included "Tweet Dreams", "Knighty Knight Bugs", "Zip N' Snort", "Mother Was a Rooster", "One Froggy Evening", "Wild and Woolly Hare", and "Hare-Less Wolf". Sylvester talks about his frustrating chase of Tweety as he undergoes psychoanalysis by an animal psychiatrist in "Tweet Dreams", and a construction worker in "One Froggy Evening" is committed to mental rehabilitation in a psychopathic hospital. Plus, the barnyard dog in "Mother Was a Rooster" says that Foghorn Leghorn is nutty as a fruitcake and ready for the loony bin because of the blustery rooster's belief of being a mother. Foghorn and the baby ostrich play baseball, which accords with Bugs' throwing of a baseball around the world in Show 5's "Hare We Go". Beer is referred to in "One Froggy Evening" and consumed in "Wild and Woolly Hare". "Hare-Less Wolf" features a slow-witted character quite like Sylvester's goony friend, Sam, in Show 5's "Trick or Tweet". In Show 5's "Hare-Way to the Stars" and Show 6's "Knighty Knight Bugs", characters (Bugs in the former cartoon and Yosemite Sam and the dragon in the latter) are rocketed into space. The "Singing Sword" in "Knighty Knight Bugs" and the singing frog in "One Froggy Evening" both have a fantastic, enchanted tuneful quality. Bugs shoots Sam in the face with a gun during a tin-can-target exercise in "Wild and Woolly Hare", and Charles M. Wolf undergoes the same indignity in "Hare-Less Wolf". Railroad mishaps happen to Sam and to Charles M. in these two cartoons.

Show 7's cartoons were "The Rabbit of Seville", "Fowl Weather", "Hen House Henery", "Highway Runnery", "Gift Wrapped", "No Parking Hare", and "Ready, Set, Zoom!". Operatic music is an essential element of "The Rabbit of Seville" as it is for Show 6's "One Froggy Evening". Construction workers are characters of "One Froggy Evening" and "No Parking Hare". Marriage between Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd in "The Rabbit of Seville" is similar to the ludicrous predicament of Sylvester in a rooster's den in "Fowl Weather". Explosive egg-hatching occurs in two of Show 7's cartoons, "Fowl Weather" and "Highway Runnery", drastically echoing the crack-opening of the ostrich egg in Show 6's "Mother Was a Rooster". Sylvester and Wile E. disguise themselves as female birds in "Fowl Weather" and "Ready, Set, Zoom!" respectively. A mother bird with her brood is seen in both "Fowl Weather" and "Hen House Henery". And a fire escape ladder prank is part of the antics of Foghorn Leghorn against the barnyard dog in "Hen House Henery" and of the teasing of Foghorn by Junior in Show 8's "The Slick Chick".

Show 8 included "The Slap-Hoppy Mouse", "Now Hare This", "The Slick Chick", "Tree For Two", "Hoppy Daze", "Lickety-Splat!", and "A Bird in a Bonnet". "The Slap-Hoppy Mouse", "Now Hare This", and "Tree For Two" all feature an admiring, little sidekick (Sylvester Jr., Big Bad Wolf's nephew, and Chester) to a larger character with aggressive aims. Balloons are utilized in "The Slick Chick", "Lickety-Splat!", and "A Bird in a Bonnet". Bugs, while pretending to be Little Red Riding Hood in "Now Hare This", wears a headdress, a hint to the coming position of Tweety in "A Bird in a Bonnet".


"Catty Cornered", "Stupor Duck", and "The Hole Idea" of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 9 all have in common the theme of crime.

Show 9's contents were "Catty Cornered", "Cannery Woe", "Stupor Duck", "Touche and Go", "The Hole Idea", "Wet Hare", and "Hare-Breadth Hurry". "Stupor Duck" features Daffy's inept heroics as the costumed, flying super-mallard, and Show 10 contains "Claws in the Lease", in which Sylvester dresses as "Super-Puss", thinking that he will rid a fat lady's house of the legions of mice that he has installed therein. Bugs attains the ability to run at tremendous speed with the use of vitamins, and Daffy has super-powers of a different sort as "Stupor Duck"- and as Cluck Trent is shown swallowing one of Dr. Pierce's Mild-Mannered Pills, which, too, are performance-altering tablets. Crime is a theme common to "Catty Cornered", "Stupor Duck", and "The Hole Idea". There is water, water everywhere in "Touche and Go", and water from a stream is the issue of contention between Bugs and Blacque Jacque Shellacque in "Wet Hare". In Show 10's "A Pizza Tweety Pie", Tweety and Granny are in the water-inundated city of Venice, which is reminiscent of the watery setting of "Touche and Go", and Tweety's comment about a dam having broken recalls the dams of "Wet Hare". So too does the title of Show 10's sole Road Runner cartoon, "Boulder Wham!", alluding to Boulder Dam. Sylvester and Blacque Jacque Shellacque bring a cannon into their conflict with a foe in "Cannery Woe" and "Wet Hare", respectively.

Show 10's cartoons were "A Pizza Tweety Pie", "The Unmentionables", "Trip For Tat", "Boulder Wham", "Dog Pounded", "Lighter Than Hare", and "Claws in the Lease". A recurring theme in Show 10 is world travel, in that this episode contains both "A Pizza Tweety Pie" and "Trip For Tat". A junk yard motif connects "Lighter Than Hare" and "Claws in the Lease". Hypnosis is performed in "Dog Pounded" and "Boulder Wham". Rocky the gangster appears in a cartoon ("The Unmentionables") in this installment and in its immediate forebear ("Catty Cornered", Show 9). One of Rocky's criminal cohorts in "The Unmentionables" is named Pizza-Puss Lasagna, alluding to Italy, which is the setting in "A Pizza Tweety Pie" and one of the places visited in "Trip For Tat". Sylvester attaches a rocket to his back in "Dog Pounded", and alien Yosemite Sam similarly dons a jet to pursue Bugs in "Lighter Than Hare". A trampoline is an element to Wile E. Coyote's pursuit of the Road Runner in "Boulder Wham" and in Show 11's "Whoa Be-Gone!".

Show 11 featured "Pre-Hysterical Hare", "Tweet and Sour", "Whoa Be-Gone!", "Hot Cross Bunny", "Muzzle Tough", "Bugs Bonnets", and "Out and Out Rout". "Hot Cross Bunny" and "Bugs Bonnets" both propose a scientific study of behavior by some change of condition effected in the head area; in "Hot Cross Bunny", the change is that of the entire psyche from one head to another, and in "Bugs Bonnets", the change is that of hats. An electric shock is experienced in "Hot Cross Bunny" (in the scientific mind-switching experiment) and in "Muzzle Tough" (when Tweety sticks Sylvester's tail into an electric socket). Show 11 contains two cartoons with reference to Boy Scouts: "Hot Cross Bunny" and "Bugs Bonnets". A jail sentence is imposed by Judge Bugs upon Elmer in "Bugs Bonnets", and Bugs tunnels into a prison in Show 12's "Big House Bunny". The question of man's evolution is raised in the sign on the hospital in "Hot Cross Bunny" (Hardly a Man is Now Alive) and obliquely in the hat experiment of "Bugs Bonnets", and man's primitive origins are viewed in "Pre-Hysterical Hare". "Tweet and Sour" features a cat similar to the one inside a trash can that Sylvester encounters at the start of Show 10's "Dog Pounded", and the cat in "Tweet and Sour" is first seen emerging from a trash can. The electrically charged headgear involved in the experiment in Show 11's "Hot Cross Bunny" is similar to the one on the electric chair in Show 12's "Big House Bunny". In "Pre-Hysterical Hare", Bugs witnesses his distant ancestor, the Sabre-Toothed Rabbit, a situation curiously relevant to "Mad as a Mars Hare" in Show 12, wherein Marvin Martian regresses Bugs through time to become a Neanderthal Rabbit. Tornadoes are common to "Whoa Be-Gone!" and Show 12's "Hairied and Hurried". And it was rather apt for Show 11, with "Bugs Bonnets" and Elmer Fudd's impersonation of a Pilgrim wishing to procure turkey meat, to be telecast on the Saturday, November 23, 1968, preceding Thanksgiving Day that year in the United States.


"Mississippi Hare", "Big House Bunny", and "Mad as a Mars Hare" were the three Bugs Bunny cartoons featured in Show 13 of Season 1 of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour. In these cartoons, Bugs must contend with a hot-tempered Mississippi gambler, imprisonment, and, on his home territory that makes Siberia look like Miami Beach, Marvin Martian.

Show 12 included "Mississippi Hare", "Duck Amuck", "Tweet Zoo", "Hairied and Hurried", "Shot and Bothered", "Big House Bunny", and "Mad as a Mars Hare". A cage motif is shared by "Tweet Zoo" and "Big House Bunny". "Big House Bunny" transpires in a prison, and Siberia, mentioned in "Mad as a Mars Hare" by Bugs in a description of the surface of planet Mars, was a place of imprisonment in Russia in both Czarist and Soviet times. Cotton pickers lift Bugs by his tail out of a cotton field in "Mississippi Hare", and Bugs, in "Mad as a Mars Hare" after landing on Mars and having a look at the bleak surface of that planet, says to a conquest-ordering Cape Canaveral controller, "Are you out of your cotton-tail-picking mind?" Sylvester encounters some big cats (i.e. Bengal tigers, lion) in the zoo in "Tweet Zoo", and from Wile E. Coyote's Burmese tiger trap in Show 13's "Stop, Look, and Hasten" will emerge a Burmese tiger. "Mad as a Mars Hare" has Bugs being reverted by Marvin's Time Projector Gun into a Neanderthal Rabbit, while Show 13's "Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare" alludes in its title to the story of "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" (the story of a civilized man being reverted into a brute). This would have been a suitable place to insert "Hyde and Hare", because Show 13 also has the Liberace imitation scene in "Wideo Wabbit" that is "akin" to Bugs' reference in "Hyde and Hare" to the entertainer and his brother, George. Daffy becomes an aviator in "Duck Amuck", a precursor to Tweety's act of piloting a flying bird cage in Show 13's "The Jet Cage". Daffy wears goggles during the airplane sequence in "Duck Amuck"; Wile E. Coyote also dons the eye protectors for his sky diving endeavor in "Hairied and Hurried". A parachute also factors into gags in both "Duck Amuck" and "Harried and Hurried". Wile E. uses a skateboard in "Shot and Bothered" and Show 11's "Out and Out Rout". These two cartoons will again be in consecutive episodes of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, Shows 24 and 25.

Show 13's cartoons were "This is a Life?", "The Jet Cage", "Mouse Wreckers", "Wideo Wabbit", "Stop, Look, and Hasten", "Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare", and "There They Go-Go-Go!". Both "This is a Life?" and "Wideo Wabbit" involve television show spoofs. Bugs activates a television in "Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare" to show to the Tasmanian Devil, via cowboy and Indian footage, how Taz's hormones are fighting with his capillaries. Elmer's suggestion in "This is a Life?" that Bugs recount the beginning of his life corresponds to the suggestion by Bugs as a Freudian psychologist in "Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare" that Taz tell about his "id vhen he vas a kid". Also, Claude Cat reads a book on psychology written by Freud in "Mouse Wreckers"! An explosive liquid is imbibed by the Tasmanian Devil in "Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare" and by Yosemite Sam in Show 14's "The Fair-Haired Hare". Wile E. Coyote literally "burns up" the road after he swallows ACME's Muscle-Building Vitamins to chase the Road Runner in "Stop, Look, and Hasten", and the Road Runner has a similar fiery effect on roads in "There They Go-Go-Go!".


"14 Carrot Rabbit", "Hare Trimmed", and "The Fair-Haired Hare", Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam cartoons all, were among the seven featured cartoons of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 14.

"14 Carrot Rabbit", "Beep Prepared", "Bewitched Bunny", "Hare Trimmed", "War and Pieces", "A Sheep in the Deep", and "The Fair-Haired Hare" were the cartoons of Show 14. Yosemite Sam believes that he has dug through the Earth to China in "14 Carrot Rabbit", and Wile E. Coyote accidentally tunnels to the Orient by means of a rocket in "War and Pieces". Bugs calls his opponent, wicked Witch Hazel, "granny" in "Bewitched Bunny", and the kindly old-lady character, Granny, is the focus of Yosemite Sam's nefarious scheming and of Bugs' righteousness in "Hare Trimmed". "Bewitched Bunny" and "Hare Trimmed" are two of Bugs most salient missions of mercy. Property rights are the focus of conflict between Bugs and Sam in "The Fair-Haired Hare", and the tussle between the two in "14 Carrot Rabbit" is also based on property rights- the rights to gold deposits. Witch Hazel and Sam attempt to poison Bugs in "Bewitched Bunny" and "The Fair-Haired Hare" respectively. This is undeniably Sam's episode. He appears with Bugs in three cartoons.

Show 15's featured cartoons were "From Hare to Heir", "Highway Runnery", "Greedy For Tweety", "Mutiny On the Bunny", "Ready, Set, Zoom!", "Woolen Under Where", and "Compressed Hare". Yosemite Sam and Bugs Bunny as reluctant domestic partners in Show 14's "The Fair-Haired Hare" is similar to the situation in Show 15's inaugural cartoon, "From Hare to Heir", in which Bugs and Sam, Duke of Yosemite, both must co-exist under the same roof, in this case in order for Sam to receive a monetary reward. Ralph Wolf/Sam Sheepdog cartoons are featured in Shows 14, 15, and 16. Ralph Wolf's knight outfit in this show's "Woolen Under Where" connects with the identical manner of dress of Sam, Duke of Yosemite in a scene in "From Hare to Heir". The leg cast condition of Tweety, Sylvester, and the bulldog in "Greedy For Tweety" accords with that of Foghorn Leghorn at the close of Show 16's "Little Boy Boo".


Three of the seven cartoons of Show 16 of Season 1 of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour were "Little Boy Boo", "Putty Tat Trouble", and "The Solid Tin Coyote". In "Little Boy Boo", Foghorn Leghorn's hope to marry to avoid a cold winter rests with whether or not he can be a good father to Egghead Jr.. In "Putty Tat Trouble", winter has already arrived in a city where Tweety is sought by both Sylvester and a one-eyed orange tabby as a desirable, gastronomically consumable object. And in "The Solid Tin Coyote", Wile E. Coyote builds a gigantic robot likeness of himself with which to pursue and capture the Road Runner.

Show 16's contents were "Duck! Rabbit! Duck!", "Little Boy Boo", "Horse Hare", "Putty Tat Trouble", "Don't Give Up the Sheep", "The Solid Tin Coyote", and "Scrambled Aches". Snowy surroundings aesthetically connect "Duck! Rabbit! Duck!" and "Putty Tat Trouble", and Foghorn Leghorn in "Little Boy Boo" expresses concern about the coming of the "coldest winter". "Putty Tat Trouble" and Tweety's statement while removing snow from his bird nest that this condition was a result of his wish for a "white Twistmas", was a rather timely inclusion for a Bugs Bunny/Road Runner installment airing on December 28, 1968. "The Solid Tin Coyote" involves the use of a robot and is followed in Show 17 by Sylvester's robot dog in "Tweet and Lovely". A cannon factors in Wile E.'s misbegotten schemes in Show 16's "Scrambled Aches" and in Show 17's "Rushing Roulette". Bugs pretends to have become a winged, angelic spirit descending to Earth in "Duck! Rabbit! Duck!"; Sylvester experiences the "real thing" in "Tweet and Lovely". Wile E. utilizes a water-dropper to prematurely rehydrate a boulder in "Scrambled Aches". Sylvester in "Tweet and Lovely", with the same instrument, extracts drops of storm cloud fluid from his chemical mixture. Stormy weather continues as a motif in Show 18's "The Dixie Fryer" and in Show 19's "Hairied and Hurried" (tornadoes).


In "The Foghorn Leghorn", a cartoon in Show 17 of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Foghorn Leghorn endeavors to demonstrate his veritable chickenness to Henery Hawk, who thinks that Foghorn is a "loud-mouthed shnook"; in "Apes of Wrath", one of the Bugs Bunny cartoons in Show 17 of Season 1 of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, Bugs suddenly comes to the startling realization that his heckling of Elvis Gorilla will no longer be tolerated; and Wile E. Coyote is in high-speed pursuit of the Road Runner in "Going! Going! Gosh!", another cartoon in Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 17.

Show 17's seven cartoons were "Devil May Hare", "Rushing Roulette", "Tweet and Lovely", "Piker's Peak", "The Foghorn Leghorn", "Apes of Wrath", and "Going! Going! Gosh!". An out-of-control boulder flattens Yosemite Sam in "Piker's Peak", rather like one does to Wile E. in the same installment's "Going! Going! Gosh!". In "The Foghorn Leghorn", Henery Hawk thinks that Foghorn Leghorn is a "loud-mouthed shnook", and in Show 18's "The Windblown Hare", Bugs, near cartoon's end, impatiently vociferates to a hesitating Big Bad Wolf, "Book, shnook, blow the (shyster Three Little Pigs') house down!" Sylvester's occupancy and use of an inventor's laboratory in "Tweet and Lovely" is reminiscent of Egghead Jr.'s mixing of chemicals in Show 16's "Little Boy Boo". Both Road Runner cartoons in this episode contain a ploy by Wile E. Coyote to drop an anvil on the Road Runner from a position aboard a flying contraption (helicopter in "Rushing Roulette", hot-air balloon carriage in "Going! Going! Gosh!") in the air above the speedy fowl.

Show 18 contained "The Windblown Hare", "Tree Cornered Tweety", To Beep or Not to Beep", "The Dixie Fryer", "Tugboat Granny", "Bonanza Bunny", "Hopalong Casualty". Show 17's "Tweet and Lovely" and Show 18's "Tree Cornered Tweety" have a common premise, that of Sylvester and Tweety in high rise buildings (a bird house in Tweety's case in "Tweet and Lovely") and Sylvester unsuccessfully trying to cross the gap. Sylvester also endeavors to cross a mine field to reach Tweety in "Tree Cornered Tweety", and in Show 19's "Strangled Eggs", Foghorn Leghorn creates a mine field into which he hopes to maneuver Henery Hawk into an explosive end. Foghorn loses his feathers to a tornado in Show 18's "The Dixie Fryer", and a tornado "turns up" in Show 19's "Hairied and Hurried". "The Dixie Fryer" involves two hillbilly chicken hawks chasing Foghorn into an explosive shed, and Foghorn obligingly lends to them a match to see in the dark. Boom!!! With a lighter, Bugs does practically the same thing to two lame-brained hillbillies in Show 19's "Hillbilly Hare".


"Hillbilly Hare", "Kit For Cat", and "Snow Business" were three of the seven featured cartoons in Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 19. In "Hillbilly Hare", Bugs dupes two fraternal yokels of the Ozarks into being participants in a violent square dance, and Sylvester must vie with a kitten to become pet in the warm household of Elmer Fudd in "Kit For Cat" and is desperate to avoid starvation in a mountain cabin in "Snow Business".

Cartoons included in Show 19 were "A-Lad-in His Lamp", "Strangled Eggs", "Hillbilly Hare", "Hairied and Hurried", "War and Pieces", "Kit For Cat", and "Snow Business". Show 18 opened with a Bugs cartoon with a storybook premise, "The Windblown Hare", as does Show 19 with "A-Lad-in His Lamp". Beard-pulling is practiced by Bugs upon his Arab antagonist, Caliph Hassan Pheffer, in "A-Lad-in His Lamp" and between the two Ozarks yokels whom Bugs induces to violently square dance in "Hillbilly Hare". Connected to the square dance in "Hillbilly Hare" is mention of calling of square dances as one of the misdeeds listed on Blacque Jacque Shellacque's 'wanted' poster in Show 18's "Bonanza Bunny". The Martin brothers becoming caught in the hay bailer in "Hillbilly Hare" seems to connect with Wile E. Coyote being sucked into the mechanism of his snow-making machine in "Hairied and Hurried". In "War and Pieces", Wile E. paints himself invisible, and in "The Leghorn Blows at Midnight" in Show 20, Foghorn Leghorn fools Henery Hawk into believing that Foghorn has rubbed vanishing cream on him. Further, Show 20's "Clippety Clobbered" contains a scene with Wile E. chemically creating an invisible paint. "Kit For Cat" and "Snow Business" have wintery settings, and Sylvester is desperate in both cartoons, to keep warm and fed by Elmer Fudd in the former, to find some food to avoid starvation in a snowbound mountain cabin in the latter. And Foghorn Leghorn also seeks a warm place for the winter in "Strangled Eggs". Sylvester pretends to revert to a kitten in "Kit For Cat" to persuade Elmer Fudd to adopt him (Fudd's response: "What a widicuwous way for a gwown-up cat to behave!), and in Show 20's "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide", he reverts in another way, regressing to the wildcat due to his mistaken consumption of Hyde formula. Bugs encounters a harem in Caliph Hassan Pheffer's palace in "A-Lad-in His Lamp", and one of Wile E.'s failed Road Runner catch ploys in "War and Pieces" is a rifle disguised as a peep show, "Secrets of a Harem".


Among the seven cartoons in Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 20 were "Robot Rabbit", "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide", Lickety-Splat!", and "Clippety Clobbered", cartoons in which Bugs is pitted in battle against a robot, a monstrously transformed Sylvester terrorizes a bully bulldog, exploding flying darts released by a balloon by Wile E. Coyote keep descending on Wile E. at most inopportune times, and Wile E. buys a chemistry set and reads about space science with which to utilize his chemical concoctions.

The cartoons of Show 20: "Robot Rabbit", "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide", "The Leghorn Blows at Midnight", "Transylvania 6-5000", "A Bird in a Guilty Cage", "Lickety-Splat!", and "Clippety Clobbered". "Robot Rabbit", a cartoon involving applied technology- a product of science- to farmer Elmer Fudd's conflict with carrot-snatching Bugs, concludes with this statement by Bugs: "Someday, these scientists are going to invent something that'll outsmart a rabbit." Science is an element in "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide" (Dr. Jerkyl's laboratory) and in "Clippety Clobbered" (Wile E.'s chemical set). Bugs leads Elmer's robot on a chase under a mechanical masher, and in "Chili Weather" in Show 21, there is a mechanical masher in the food processing factory wherein Sylvester pursues Speedy Gonzales. Monstrous flying things, a Hyde-formula-transformed fly and Count Bloodcount in bat form, figure in "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide" and "Transylvania 6-5000". Bugs and Henery Hawk use the word, "nincom-poop", in "Robot Rabbit" and "The Leghorn Blows at Midnight". Sylvester swallows trouble in both "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide" (Hyde formula) and "A Bird in a Guilty Cage" (a stick of dynamite).

Show 21's cartoons were "Beanstalk Bunny", "Double or Mutton", "The Wild Chase", "Bugsy and Mugsy", "Hawaiian Aye Aye", "Chili Weather", and "Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner". A magnet is used by Wile E. Coyote and Sylvester in "The Wild Chase" and by Bugs in "Bugsy and Mugsy". Rainfall occurs in "Double or Mutton" and "Bugsy and Mugsy", and Wile E. does an Indian dance to effect rain in "Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner". Sylvester is reduced in size in "Chili Weather", a condition which thematically consorts with the proportions of Bugs and Daffy in Elmer Fudd's giant realm in "Beanstalk Bunny". A castle is the setting for some of "Beanstalk Bunny" and for much of Show 20's "Transylvania 6-5000". The fake female Road Runner decoy used by Wile E. in Show 21's "Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner" corresponds with Sylvester's final scheme in Show 22's "Home Tweet Home", to lure Tweety into his grasp with application of a tree and nest disguise and a female bird call. And a light fixture dropping from a ceiling on top of a sleeping character and another character trying to prevent such from happening, only to appear guilty of causing the light fixture's fall, is a commonality between Show 19's "Kit For Cat" and Show 21's "Bugsy and Mugsy".


Three of the seven featured cartoons in Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 22 were "Beep Prepared", "Claws For Alarm", and "Home Tweet Home". "Beep Prepared" ends with Wile E. Coyote being launched into space and becoming a stellar constellation. "Claws For Alarm" has Porky Pig and Sylvester spending a night at a forsaken hotel inhabited by malevolent mice. And in "Home Tweet Home", Sylvester's numerous schemes to gain carnivorous possession of Tweety are situated in a city park.

In Show 22, the featured cartoons were "The Hasty Hare", "Beep Prepared", "Claws For Alarm", "Roman Legion-Hare", "Home Tweet Home", "Terrier Stricken", and "Sugar and Spies". Bugs is abducted into space by Marvin Martian and K-9 in "The Hasty Hare", and the final gag in "Beep Prepared" has Wile E. Coyote being rocketed into space and becoming a constellation after the rocket explodes. And in "Sugar and Spies", the Road Runner sends Wile E. to the Moon with the use of a rocket device that Wile E. built with a spy kit. In "Home Tweet Home", bubble gum is involved when one of Sylvester's attempts to catch Tweety goes awry, and Yosemite Sam becomes "all stuck-up" by bubble gum in Show 23's "Rabbit Every Monday"! Show 22 contains "Roman Legion-Hare"; Show 23 has "Tweety's Circus". Suffice to say that Yosemite Sam and Sylvester are both lion-fodder. Claude Cat plunges into a waterless pool in "Terrier Stricken", and in Show 23, Sylvester high-dives into a bucket from which Tweety had an elephant extract all of the H2O- and both of these are suitably succeeded by the high-diving prospectus of "High Diving Hare" of Show 25. Moreover, the music accompanying Claude's pool scene is circus-oriented, associating "Terrier Stricken" further with "Tweety's Circus". The gag with the un-whoa-able Roman horse in "Roman Legion-Hare" is very much like that with the camel in "Sahara Hare" in Show 23. Tweety bathes in "Home Tweet Home", and a hot bath is prepared for Frisky Puppy in "Terrier Stricken". Bugs refers to Halloween when he is confronted by Marvin Martian and K-9 in "The Hasty Hare", and spooks are the order of the day (or rather, night) for Sylvester in "Claws For Alarm". Marvin's headgear is like that of an ancient Roman soldier, which is precisely the role of Yosemite Sam in "Roman Legion-Hare", Sam being indeed a wearer of a distinctive Roman helmet. Bugs and later his two antagonists in "The Hasty Hare" are put into straitjackets, and in "Claws For Alarm", Porky Pig inquires as to whether there is any insanity in Sylvester's family. The forsaken Dry Gulch Hotel of "Claws For Alarm" whose only remaining occupants, several mice, create suspicion and fractious division among two comers, Porky and Sylvester, unto their premises, recalls the condemned building of Show 21's "Bugsy and Mugsy" and the effort of that building's resident, Bugs, to sneakily generate distrust and animosity in the criminal duo of Rocky and Mugsy, who have selected that building as their hideout. Bugs also endeavors in "The Hasty Hare" to create disharmony in the relationship between Marvin Martian and K-9, his would-be abductors.


Among the cartoons of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 23 were "Rabbit Every Monday", Sahara Hare, and "Tweety's Circus", cartoons with Bugs inside of hunter Yosemite Sam's cabin, with Bugs raising the ire of Riff Raff (Yosemite) Sam, guardian of the Sahara Desert, and with Sylvester and Tweety in a circus big top.

The contents of Show 23 were "Rabbit Every Monday", "Gee Whiz-z-z-z!", "Pre-Hysterical Hare", "Sahara Hare", "Tweety's Circus", "Pop 'im Pop!", and "Tired and Feathered". An elephant is seen in "Pre-Hysterical Hare", "Sahara Hare", "Tweety's Circus", and "Pop 'im Pop", the latter two cartoons involving circuses. There is also a circus reference in "Sahara Hare", when Bugs asks to Riff Raff (Yosemite) Sam, "You with the sideshow around here?" Wile E. Coyote, in Show 23's "Tired and Feathered", grabs two of the Road Runner's feathers and tries to use them to fly, like Sylvester does with two of Tweety's feathers in Show 24's "Hyde and Go Tweet". Wile E. peers through binoculars at the start of "Tired and Feathered", as he also does in Show 24's "Out and Out Rout".


Three of the seven cartoons of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 24 were "Long-Haired Hare", "Bully For Bugs", and "Hyde and Go Tweet", cartoons in which Bugs is compelled to declare personal war against formidable, bullying opponents and Sylvester must contend with a chemically-induced hulk of an alter-ego to tiny Tweety.

In Show 24, the cartoons were "Cats and Bruises", "Long-Haired Hare", "Whoa Be-Gone!", "Bully For Bugs", "Hyde and Go Tweet", "Who's Kitten Who?", and "Out and Out Rout". In Bugs' cartoons of Show 24, he is confronted with some formidably bullying foes. And Sylvester meets a most overbearing, exceedingly hostile enemy in one of his cartoons- to his sheer, body-falling-apart terror! Wile E. Coyote uses a hunting bird in "Out and Out Rout", which is quite apt after Tweety becomes a monstrous bird of prey in the same episode's "Hyde and Go Tweet", and the two doves that Wile E. ties to his feet in one of his other "Out and Out Rout" attempts at capturing the Road Runner also connect with "Hyde and Go Tweet" in that the doves eventually are pulling a dangling Wile E. beneath them, which is how the Tweety monster pulls Sylvester out of a jump to the street, and Sylvester in an earlier scene in "Hyde and Go Tweet" chases a trio of doves on a window ledge. In "Whoa Be-Gone!", Wile E. tries to ride a thin wire, which could be said to accord with the high wire onto which Sylvester chases Tweety in "Tweety's Circus" of Show 23. Sylvester builds a hot rod to chase Speedy Gonzales in "Cats and Bruises", and Wile E. does the same to try to catch the Road Runner in "Out and Out Rout". An advertisement for a bullfight can be seen on a fence in "Cats and Bruises", which may be regarded as foreshadowing "Bully For Bugs". A wind storm in "Out and Out Rout" is not as strong as the one generated by Wile E.'s ACME Tornado Seeds in "Whoa Be-Gone!", but as both cartoons are in Show 24 (and were together also in Show 11), it is an interesting correspondence! Sylvester standing at ground level with mouth open to ingest the falling Tweety in "Hyde and Go Tweet" summons recollection of the lion poised to swallow Sylvester plummeting from the high wire in Show 23's "Tweety's Circus". Third cartoon of part two in Show 23 and Show 24 is a vehicle for the trio of Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper, and both "Pop 'im Pop!" and "Who's Kitten Who?" start with Hippety escaping captivity, bouncing through a community, and coming upon the two generations of Sylvester. And the upstanding-looking man in "Who's Kitten Who?" disposing of a bottle marked, "XXX" (an implicit alcoholic beverage), after witnessing Hippety Hopper still in crate skipping up and down along a sidewalk, is somewhat reminiscent of Dr. Jekyll and his drink of disagreeable portent in "Hyde and Go Tweet".


Some of the cartoons of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1, Show 25 were "Frigid Hare", "Cheese it- the Cat!", and "Sandy Claws", putting Bugs in Antarctica, mice versions of Ralph Kramden and Ed Norton of television's The Honeymooners in pursuit of a cupcake for a birthday, and Sylvester and Tweety on a beach buffeted by high waves.

Show 25 was comprised of "Two's a Crowd", "Frigid Hare", "Cheese it- the Cat!", "High Diving Hare", "Shot and Bothered", "Sandy Claws", and "Zoom at the Top". Frisky Puppy is a spouse's birthday present in "Two's a Crowd", and Ralph Crumden and Ned Morton (rodent variants of Ralph Kramden and Ed Norton of television's The Honeymooners) act in "Cheese it- the Cat!" to attain an object of birthday celebration (in their instance, a cupcake) for Ralph's beloved Alice. Crumden rides a projectile champagne cork in "Cheese it- the Cat!", as too does Sylvester in "Tweety and the Beanstalk" in Show 26. "High Diving Hare" contains some of the same elements as "Tweety's Circus" two shows earlier, them being cartoon character as carnival barker, high diving act, and something going wrong (either by accident or by design) at end of fall during high dive. Yosemite Sam and Sylvester endure repeated, unpleasant exposure to quantities of water in "High Diving Hare" and "Sandy Claws". Sylvester is gulped whole by a giant fish in "Sandy Claws"; the lion in "Tweety's Circus" and the Tweety monster in "Hyde and Go Tweet" respectively did the same to Sylvester in the previous two installments. Bugs dons a bathing suit in "High Diving Hare" and also wears such a garment in "Frigid Hare". Granny, too, garbs herself in bathing dress (of sorts) in "Sandy Claws".

Finally, Show 26's contents were "Rabbit Romeo", "Tweety and the Beanstalk", "Weasel While You Work", "Big House Bunny", "War and Pieces", "A Street Cat Named Sylvester", and "Going! Going! Gosh!". "Tweety and the Beanstalk" and "War and Pieces" respectively send Sylvester and Wile E. through the Earth to the Orient. Snowy settings connect "Rabbit Romeo", "Weasel While You Work", "A Street Cat Named Sylvester", and Show 25's "Frigid Hare". Tweety mixes an unhealthy cocktail in Sylvester's medicine bottle in this episode's "A Street Cat Named Sylvester" and Show 1's "Tweety's S.O.S.". Sylvester chops down the beanstalk in "Tweety and the Beanstalk" and tries to do the same to a tree containing Tweety's nest in "Tweet, Tweet, Tweety" in Show 1.

If this analysis does not summon visions of a group of people standing around a schedule and arranging cartoons to run in a compellingly peculiar fashion, it at the very least suggests that the people behind the initial season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour had a semi-conscious or unconscious awareness of how strikingly correspondent the phenomena of particular cartoons are and communicated this awareness by arranging cartoons in a coincidentally suggestive manner in a weekly television series. Indeed, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was truly a classic and fascinating television show!

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (Sept. 14, 1968)
For this show with cartoons located on an ocean liner and in Scotland, Tasmania, a food processing factory, a forest, and
a desert beset by a violently trembling coyote, Bugs introduces Daffy as emcee. Daffy, emerging from his broom closet 
dressing room, attracts the carnivorous wrath of the Tasmanian Devil, who escapes from a backstage crate.
PART ONE
"My Bunny Lies Over the Sea" with Bugs Bunny and Angus McCrory
"Tweety's S.O.S." with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"I Gopher You" with the Goofy Gophers
PART TWO
"The Solid Tin Coyote" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Bedevilled Rabbit" with Bugs Bunny and Tasmanian Devil
"Tweet, Tweet, Tweety" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Hopalong Casualty" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (Sept. 21, 1968)
Mid-winter hunting season, the Battle of Bagel Heights, and late-1800s San Franciscan gambling are Bugs' predicaments of
this episode, Sylvester contends with a bulldog on a train and fights against his son's bird friend, and Wile E. Coyote 
is plagued by a problematic catapult.
PART ONE
"All Abir-r-rd" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Duck! Rabbit! Duck!" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Elmer Fudd- oddly shown with full original title sequence
"To Beep or Not to Beep" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
PART TWO
"Bunker Hill Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Shot and Bothered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Barbary Coast Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Nasty Canasta
"Birds of a Father" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner play tennis, with hand grenades! One of the hand grenades becomes entangled in Wile 
E.'s tennis racket and explodes in Wile E.'s face.

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (Sept. 28, 1968)
Foghorn Leghorn uses Harry Houdini's magic hat to cause Henery Hawk to seemingly vanish, and thus begins a show depicting
Bugs' rise to stardom and Bugs' performance in a medieval jousting tournament, Sylvester's chase of Tweety in San 
Francisco and in the story of Little Red Riding Hood, and Daffy's quest- as a rooster- for a $5,000 prize. 
PART ONE
"What's Up, Doc?" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Don't Axe Me" with Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, and Mrs. Fudd
"Stop, Look, and Hasten" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
PART TWO
"Canary Row" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"You Were Never Duckier" with Daffy Duck and Henery Hawk
"Knights Must Fall" with Bugs Bunny and Sir Pantsalot of Dropseat Manor
"Red Riding Hoodwinked" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and the Big Bad Wolf
Wile E. Coyote shovels through sandy ground to construct a pit-trap with which to capture the Road Runner but plunges
through the bottom of his hole and into the path of a train emerging from a tunnel.

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (Oct. 5, 1968)
Granny's bulldog-filled yard confounds Tweety-craving Sylvester, who also engages in a struggle with Hippety Hopper in a
museum- during an installment containing further adventures for Bugs in medieval times.
PART ONE
"Shiskabugs" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Beep Prepared" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Mouse-Taken Identity" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
PART TWO
"A Fractured Leghorn" with Foghorn Leghorn
"Prince Violent" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Ain't She Tweet" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Fast and Furry-ous" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (Oct. 12, 1968)
Foghorn Leghorn introduces hostess Miss Prissy, who performs with him in the first cartoon- and following it are Wile E.
Coyote's ill-fated Batman costume, Sylvester's pursuit of fishy food in an aquarium, a friendly war over canary 
possession between Sylvester and an orange-furred pal, and Bugs' inadvertent rocketing to a Martian space platform.
PART ONE
"Lovelorn Leghorn" with Foghorn Leghorn and Miss Prissy
"Gee Whiz-z-z-z!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Bill of Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Tasmanian Devil
PART TWO
"Fish and Slips" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
The Road Runner drinks from a water cooler, above which Wile E. Coyote drops a boulder from a cliff. The Road Runner zips
away from the water cooler before the boulder completes its fall, and Wile E. is startled by the Road Runner's sudden
beeping behind him and stupidly "runs for cover" under the water cooler. The boulder hits ground on top of Wile E. 
directly next to the water cooler, with Wile E.'s head becoming "pickled" inside of the water cooler jug.
"Hare We Go" with Bugs Bunny and Chris Columbus
"Trick or Tweet" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Hare-Way to the Stars" with Bugs Bunny and Marvin Martian
Wile E. Coyote hides beneath a manhole cover with the expectation of surprising and grabbing the Road Runner, only to be
struck by a beep-beeping truck.  

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (Oct. 19, 1968)
For this show of psychiatrics, singing sword and frog, mother rooster of an ostrich, a "chicken run" of two locomotives,
and a forgetful wolf, Daffy dresses as Bugs to be emcee but is pursued backstage by a sheepdog who thinks that Daffy 
really is a rabbit.
PART ONE
"Tweet Dreams" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Knighty Knight Bugs" with Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam, and the Dragon
"Zip N' Snort" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
PART TWO
"Mother Was a Rooster" with Foghorn Leghorn
"One Froggy Evening" with Michigan J. Frog
"Wild and Woolly Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Hare-Less Wolf" with Bugs Bunny and Charles M. Wolf
Wile E. Coyote sketches a picture on an easel. The picture consists of Wile E., rifle in hand, with the Road Runner at 
his side, and when Wile E. turns his back from the easel to grab the real Road Runner, who has stopped behind him to look
at the drawing, the Wile E. on the easel fires his rifle into the real Wile E.'s back.

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (Oct. 26, 1968)
As the stage is prepared for "The Rabbit of Seville", Bugs introduces the first cartoon in an installment with Sylvester 
disguised as a scarecrow and as a hen, Foghorn Leghorn wilfully stepping into Henery Hawk's lasso trap, and Bugs 
competing against a brawny freeway builder.
PART ONE
"The Rabbit of Seville" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Fowl Weather" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and Hector Bulldog
"Hen House Henery" with Foghorn Leghorn and Henery Hawk
PART TWO
"Highway Runnery" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Gift Wrapped" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"No Parking Hare" with Bugs Bunny and the Construction Worker
"Ready, Set, Zoom!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (Nov. 2, 1968)
A variety of experience for Sylvester in his attempt to tutor his son in catching mice, in his unwitting victory, by 
means of mistaken identity with a fierce black panther, against two canine foes, in his desire to be the prevailing 
sparring partner against a "giant mouse", and in his effort to snatch Tweety from the chapeau donned by Granny.
PART ONE
"The Slap-Hoppy Mouse" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Now Hare This" with Bugs Bunny and the Big Bad Wolf
A mischievous artist draws Foghorn Leghorn with Rock Hudson's body and a broom tail.
"The Slick Chick" with Foghorn Leghorn
PART TWO
"Tree For Two" with Sylvester, Spike, and Chester
"Hoppy Daze" with Sylvester and Hippety Hopper
"Lickety-Splat!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"A Bird in a Bonnet" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
Wile E. Coyote disguises himself as a Road Runner, and the Road Runner conceals his speedy body inside a coyote costume.

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (Nov. 9, 1968)
Clips from "Hare-Breadth Hurry" begin this show in which Bugs substitutes for the absent Road Runner, Tweety is captive
of Rocky the gangster, Daffy as super-hero fights a non-existent criminal, and Speedy contends with Sylvester to gain 
admittance to a cheese store.
PART ONE
"Catty Cornered" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Rocky
"Cannery Woe" with Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester
"Stupor Duck" with Daffy Duck
PART TWO
"Touche and Go" with Pepe Le Pew
"The Hole Idea" with Calvin Q. Calculus
"Wet Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Blacque Jacque Shellacque
"Hare-Breadth Hurry" with Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (Nov. 16, 1968)
Around the world with Granny, Tweety, and Sylvester, Wile E. Coyote cannot cross a chasm to reach the Road Runner, and 
Bugs acts as a 1920s crime-buster and is also the champion of Earth against Yosemite Sam of Outer Space.
PART ONE
"A Pizza Tweety Pie" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"The Unmentionables" with Bugs Bunny, Rocky, and Mugsy
"Trip For Tat" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
PART TWO
"Boulder Wham!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Dog Pounded" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Lighter Than Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Claws in the Lease" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
Wile E. Coyote's scheme to drop an explosive rocket atop the Road Runner is a failure.

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (Nov. 23, 1968)
A film of pre-history, a planned experimental swapping of psyches between Bugs and a chicken, a study of the behavioral
effects upon Elmer and Bugs of various hats, and a chicken farm and an intercity brownstone as places for Sylvester and 
Tweety's hijinks are what distinguish this installment.
PART ONE
"Pre-Hysterical Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Tweet and Sour" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Whoa Be-Gone!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
PART TWO
"Hot Cross Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and the Bespectacled Doctor
"Muzzle Tough" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Bugs Bonnets" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Out and Out Rout" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (Nov. 30, 1968)
This episode's phenomena includes music, poker, a prankish animator, caged but not harmless zoo animals, Wile E. Coyote
riding a skateboard, an irritable prison warden, and Marvin Martian's Time-Projector gun. On stage, Bugs impersonates 
Elvis and awakens Yosemite Sam, who ruins Bugs' guitar. Sam later knots the trumpet that Bugs tries to play. 
PART ONE
"Mississippi Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Colonel Shuffle
"Duck Amuck" with Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny
"Tweet Zoo" with Tweety and Sylvester
PART TWO
"Hairied and Hurried" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Shot and Bothered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Big House Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Mad as a Mars Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Marvin Martian
Wile E. Coyote rides a motorcycle to chase the Road Runner up a steep rock formation and finds himself on the underside
of a precipice, from which he falls, demolishing the motorcycle.

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (Dec. 7, 1968)
Television programs are parodied, Tweety becomes pilot of a flying birdcage, Wile E. Coyote swallows many vitamins to 
move as rapidly as the Road Runner, and Bugs plays doctor to the Tasmanian Devil in a jungle medical outpost. 
PART ONE
"This is a Life?" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam, and Granny
"The Jet Cage" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Mouse Wreckers" with Claude Cat, Hubie, and Bertie
PART TWO
"Wideo Wabbit" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Stop, Look, and Hasten" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Tasmanian Devil
"There They Go-Go-Go!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (Dec. 14, 1968)
In this show, Bugs contests Yosemite Sam's claims to land ownership and the greedy villain's illicit aim to marry wealthy
Granny, and combats wicked Witch Hazel and her scheme to feast upon Hansel and Gretel. 
PART ONE
"14 Carrot Rabbit" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Beep Prepared" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
For 'Reading Out Loud Night', Bugs selects a book from a shelf and walks into a backdrop, demonstrating how one can, 
"...get away with nearly anything in an animated cartoon."
"Bewitched Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Witch Hazel
PART TWO
"Hare Trimmed" with Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam, and Granny
"War and Pieces" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"A Sheep in the Deep" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"The Fair-Haired Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
Wile E. Coyote underestimates the recoil force of his corked "bingo cannon".

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (Dec. 21, 1968)
More conflict between Bugs and Yosemite Sam, in a Middle Age castle owned by Sam, Duke of Yosemite, and on the Sad Sack, 
formerly the Jolly Roger. Also in this episode: Sylvester and Tweety hospitalized, Wile E. Coyote the victim of an 
exploding robot infant Road Runner and of his super-magnet directed at Bugs' new, desert abode, and Ralph Wolf 
attempting, with an armored unicycle, to outwit Sam Sheepdog.
PART ONE
"From Hare to Heir" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Highway Runnery" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Greedy For Tweety" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
PART TWO
"Mutiny On the Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Ready, Set, Zoom!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Woolen Under Where" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"Compressed Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (Dec. 28, 1968)
Bugs introduces dancing pens Penelope and Penbroke, who write the title of the first cartoon, containing Bugs and Daffy's
encounter with hunter Elmer Fudd. A boy chick with a high IQ, Bugs and Yosemite Sam in a duel at Fort Lariat, Sylvester
and an orange cat chasing Tweety in a snowy city, a robot coyote, dehydrated boulders, and a steam roller are other 
elements of this distinctive installment.
PART ONE
"Duck! Rabbit! Duck!" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Elmer Fudd
"Little Boy Boo" with Foghorn Leghorn, Miss Prissy, and Egghead Jr.
"Horse Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
PART TWO
"Putty Tat Trouble" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Don't Give Up the Sheep" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"The Solid Tin Coyote" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Scrambled Aches" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (Jan. 4, 1969)
Eluding a Tasmanian Devil, mountain climbing, and playing baby monkey to an ill-tempered gorilla comprise Bugs' exploits
of this show- and Sylvester becomes inventor, the Road Runner a pianist, and Foghorn Leghorn a little chicken hawk's
dinner.
PART ONE
"Devil May Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Tasmanian Devil
"Rushing Roulette" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tweet and Lovely" with Tweety and Sylvester
PART TWO
"Piker's Peak" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"The Foghorn Leghorn" with Foghorn Leghorn and Henery Hawk
"Apes of Wrath" with Bugs Bunny and the Drunken Stork
"Going! Going! Gosh!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (Jan. 11, 1969)
A forgetful Big Bad Wolf and a French-Canadian Klondike outlaw are Bugs' foes in a show with diverse cartoon locations
including a metropolis, a tugboat, a Yukon saloon, and the Deep South.
PART ONE
"The Windblown Hare" with Bugs Bunny and the Big Bad Wolf
"Tree Cornered Tweety" with Tweety and Sylvester
Daffy thinks that Bugs is going to introduce him, but Bugs instead honors the sponsor.
"To Beep or Not to Beep" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
PART TWO
"The Dixie Fryer" with Foghorn Leghorn, Pappy, and Elvis
"Tugboat Granny" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Bonanza Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Blacque Jacque Shellacque
"Hopalong Casualty" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (Jan. 18, 1969)
Adventures in Baghdad and in the Ozark Mountains for Bugs, Sylvester is desperate for winter shelter and food, and 
Foghorn Leghorn's aim of marrying Miss Prissy to avoid a cold winter in his dilapidated rooster coop, becomes
complicated by the arrival on Prissy's doorstep of a foundling Henery Hawk.
PART ONE
"A-Lad-in His Lamp" with Bugs Bunny and Smoky the Genie
"Strangled Eggs" with Foghorn Leghorn, Henery Hawk, and Miss Prissy
"Hillbilly Hare" with Bugs Bunny and the Martin Brothers
PART TWO
"Hairied and Hurried" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"War and Pieces" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Kit For Cat" with Sylvester and Elmer Fudd
"Snow Business" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
Wile E. Coyote attempts and fails to ride atop a rocket in his pursuit of the Road Runner. 

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (Jan. 25, 1969)
Bugs selects Sylvester as emcee for this episode wherein the lisping cat is transformed into a wildcat by Hyde formula
and pursues Tweety in a department store, Bugs confronts a robot and a vampire, and Wile E. Coyote releases explosive 
darts from a balloon and mixes chemicals to produce invisibility and a bouncing skin. Sylvester is applauded by 
Sylvester Jr., who is seated atop a crate containing Hippety Hopper. 
PART ONE
"Robot Rabbit" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Dr. Jerkyl's Hide" with Sylvester, Spike, and Chester
"The Leghorn Blows at Midnight" with Foghorn Leghorn and Henery Hawk
PART TWO
"Transylvania 6-5000" with Bugs Bunny and Count Bloodcount
"A Bird in a Guilty Cage" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Lickety-Splat!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Clippety Clobbered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (Feb. 1, 1969)
With gunpoint, Rocky and Mugsy commandeer the show and appear in one of the cartoons. An exotic show of storybook,
fielded, Hawaiian, and Mexican locations- and with a tussle over who among a rabbit and duck is named Jack, a race, and
an Indian rain dance.
PART ONE
"Beanstalk Bunny" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Elmer Fudd
"Double or Mutton" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"The Wild Chase" with Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Sylvester, and Speedy Gonzales
PART TWO
"Bugsy and Mugsy" with Bugs Bunny, Rocky, and Mugsy
"Hawaiian Aye Aye" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Chili Weather" with Sylvester and Speedy Gonzales
"Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (Feb. 8, 1969)
Outer space, a hotel in a ghost town, Emperor Nero's Rome, a city park, and a desert visited by a hunted espionage agent
provide the settings for this show's hilarity.
PART ONE
"The Hasty Hare" with Bugs Bunny, Marvin Martian, and K-9
"Beep Prepared" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Claws for Alarm" with Porky Pig and Sylvester
PART TWO
"Roman Legion-Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Home Tweet Home" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Terrier Stricken" with Claude Cat and Frisky Puppy
"Sugar and Spies" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (Feb. 15, 1969)
Bugs finds a party in Yosemite Sam's oven and a desert where he expected Miami Beach to be, elephants and other circus
animals complicate the lives of Sam and Sylvester, and Wile E. Coyote builds a phoney bird sanctuary to entrap the Road
Runner in a dynamite-primed telephone booth.
PART ONE
"Rabbit Every Monday" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Gee Whiz-z-z-z!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Pre-Hysterical Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd- oddly shown with full original title sequence
PART TWO
"Sahara Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Tweety's Circus" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Pop 'im Pop!" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Tired and Feathered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (Feb. 22, 1969)
An opera music auditorium, a bullfight ring, Dr. Jekyll's high-rise laboratory, and a windy desert are the locales for
this installment with such images as Tweety as a monster, Sylvester Jr. with a paper bag over his head, and Sylvester and
Wile E. Coyote at the controls of hot rods.
PART ONE
"Cats and Bruises" with Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester
"Long-Haired Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Giovanni Jones
"Whoa Be-Gone!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
PART TWO
"Bully For Bugs" with Bugs Bunny and the Bull
"Hyde and Go Tweet" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Who's Kitten Who?" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Out and Out Rout" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (Mar. 1, 1969)
Emcees Mac and Tosh, the Goofy Gophers, argue about who should introduce the cartoons in a show with these featured 
events: Claude Cat is determined to rid his happy home of a newcomer boisterous puppy; Bugs finds himself in Antarctica
where he befriends a penguin being chased by an Eskimo; mice Ralph Crumden and Ned Morton are opposed by a cat in their 
aim to obtain a refrigerated cupcake; Bugs is ordered by gun-toting Yosemite Sam to perform a high diving act; Sylvester
chases Tweety on a beach; and Wile E. Coyote is dynamited, bear trapped, frozen, and boomeranged.
PART ONE
"Two's a Crowd" with Claude Cat and Frisky Puppy
"Frigid Hare" with Bugs Bunny and the Penguin
"Cheese it- the Cat!" with the Honey-Mousers
PART TWO
"High Diving Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Shot and Bothered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Sandy Claws" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Zoom at the Top" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (Mar. 8, 1969)
In the content of this episode, Bugs is pursued by an amorous but unattractive female bunny, Sylvester finds a giant 
Tweety in a castle at the top of a beanstalk and in Granny's home becomes bedridden with a broken arm and leg, Wile E.
Coyote tunnels through the Earth to China, and Foghorn Leghorn indulges in some winter fun.
PART ONE
"Rabbit Romeo" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Tweety and the Beanstalk" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Weasel While You Work" with Foghorn Leghorn and the Weasel
PART TWO
"Big House Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"War and Pieces" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"A Street Cat Named Sylvester" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and Hector Bulldog
"Going! Going! Gosh!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
The following is a full broadcast history for The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour on Canada's CBC television network.


Three of the cartoons featured in the eighteenth installment of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour's first season were "The Windblown Hare", "Tree Cornered Tweety", and "Bonanza Bunny". In "The Windblown Hare", Bugs buys some houses that are promptly blown down by the Big Bad Wolf, against whom Bugs then declares war. In "Tree Cornered Tweety", Sylvester brazenly knocks at the door to the apartment of Tweety's owner, who, Sylvester learns, wields a ferocious broom. And in "Bonanza Bunny", Bugs is in Canada, in the Yukon Territory, where he encounters French-Canadian outlaw Blacque Jacque Shellacque.

CBC Broadcast History

From 1969 to 1975, the first season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was repeatedly shown in Canada on CBC Television. This is a Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour broadcast history focusing on CBC Television stations in Canada's eastern Maritimes.


The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) offered The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour on CBC Television between 1969 and 1975. Pictured on left is a CBC Television logo used in 1973 during the fifth CBC broadcast year for The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, and shown on right is a CBC logo from the late 1960s.

The CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) was- and still is- a government-owned entity. A considerable percentage of its funding comes from the taxes of Canadians, with advertising revenue from programming on its English-language and French-language television networks being a further component of the CBC operating budget. In the early 1970s, whilst The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was being aired on CBC Television, the CBC's importing of programming from the U.S. and the selling of advertising time in that programming, was a generator of sizable monies for the CBC. However, only a fraction of each Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour commercial interval on CBC Television, was allocated to the showing of product advertising. Public Service Announcements and promotion for upcoming programming on CBC filled the remaining time in those commercial intervals.

CBC Television transmitted to its CBC-owned-and-operated television stations in major cities and to privately-owned, CBC-affiliated television stations in smaller markets. The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was designated a full-CBC-Television-network presentation, with the CBC-owned-and-operated television stations airing it and the CBC-affiliated television stations recommended to do so also.

The CBC Television network signal in the eastern Maritime provinces was broadcast out of CBHT in Halifax, Nova Scotia. CBHT was owned and operated by the CBC, as was CBCT in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and, eventually, CBIT in Sydney, Nova Scotia. The province of New Brunswick did not have a CBC-owned-and-operated television station, and consequently, the availability of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour in New Brunswick depended on the whims of the CBC-affiliated broadcasters in that province. The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour did twice disappear for awhile on CKCD in Campbellton, New Brunswick and on CKCD's re-transmitter, CKAM, that served the Miramichi region of the province. But from early 1972 onward, CKCD was quite faithful to the CBC Television network Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour broadcasts.

CHSJ in Saint John, New Brunswick, was another matter. During its first years on the CBC, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour vanished often on CHSJ. And starting October 28, 1972, CHSJ began a practice of videotape-delaying the CBC Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour telecasts, offering episodes a week or more later than broadcast on the main CBC Television network. CHSJ would desist from this practice during the summer months and then resume it come autumn. Because a thorough record of CHSJ's presentation of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour would render a broadcast history quite chaotic, only CHSJ's simultaneous telecasts with the main CBC Television network are included here.

The remainder of the country saw the same episodes each Saturday. Airtime did vary by Canadian region, however. All airtimes in the listings below are in Atlantic Time. The provinces of Ontario and Quebec usually saw The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour at 5 P.M., their time, Eastern Time. Western provinces tended to see the television show at either 5 or 6 P.M., their time, before Hockey Night in Canada in the autumn and winter months.

CBC Full-Network Broadcasts (1969-75) Saturdays

CBC Maritimes Stations
2- CKCW- Moncton, New Brunswick (until Sept. 20, 1969)
3- CBHT- Halifax, Nova Scotia
4- CHSJ- Saint John, New Brunswick
4a- CJCB- Sydney, Nova Scotia (until Sept. 25, 1972)
5- CBIT- Sydney, Nova Scotia (starting Sept. 26, 1972)
7- CKCD- Campbellton, New Brunswick (starting Sept. 21, 1969)
13- CBCT- Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Date                 Channels         Episode                                   Airtime 

Sept. 6, 1969        2 3 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1           5:30 P.M.
Sept. 13, 1969       2 3 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2           5:30 P.M.
Sept. 20, 1969       2 3 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3           5:30 P.M.
Sept. 27, 1969       3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4           5:30 P.M.
Oct. 4, 1969         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5           5:30 P.M.
Oct. 11, 1969        Network Preemption
Oct. 18, 1969        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6           5:30 P.M.
Oct. 25, 1969        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7           5:30 P.M.
Nov. 1, 1969         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8           5:30 P.M.
Nov. 8, 1969         Network Preemption
Nov. 15, 1969        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9           5:30 P.M.
Nov. 22, 1969        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10          5:30 P.M.
Nov. 29, 1969        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11          5:30 P.M.
Dec. 6, 1969         3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12          4 P.M.
Dec. 13, 1969        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13          3 P.M.
Dec. 20, 1969        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14          5 P.M. 
Dec. 27, 1969        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15          5:30 P.M.         
Jan. 3, 1970         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16          5 P.M.
Jan. 10, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17          4 P.M.
Jan. 17, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18          3 P.M.
Jan. 24, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19          4 P.M.
Jan. 31, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20          4 P.M.
Feb. 7, 1970         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21          4 P.M.
Feb. 14, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22          4 P.M.
Feb. 21, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23          4 P.M.
Feb. 28, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24          5 P.M.
Mar. 7, 1970         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25          5 P.M.
Mar. 14, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26          5 P.M.
Mar. 21, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       5 P.M.
Mar. 28, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       5 P.M.
Apr. 4, 1970         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       5 P.M.
Apr. 11, 1970        Network Preemption
Apr. 18, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       5 P.M.
Apr. 25, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (R)       5 P.M.
May 2, 1970          3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       5 P.M.
May 9, 1970          3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       5 P.M.
May 16, 1970         Network Preemption
May 23, 1970         3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      5:30 P.M.
May 30, 1970         3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jun. 6, 1970         Network Preemption
Jun. 13, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jun. 20, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      4 P.M.
Jun. 27, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jul. 4, 1970         Network Preemption
Jul. 11, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jul. 18, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      4 P.M.
Jul. 25, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      4 P.M.
Aug. 1, 1970         3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 8, 1970         3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      5:30 P.M. 
Aug. 15, 1970        3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 22, 1970        3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 29, 1970        3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Sept. 5, 1970        3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Sept. 12, 1970       3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Sept. 19, 1970       3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Sept. 26, 1970       3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 3, 1970         3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 10, 1970        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 17, 1970        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 24, 1970        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 31, 1970        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Nov. 7, 1970         3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Nov. 14, 1970        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       3:00 P.M.
Nov. 21, 1970        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Nov. 28, 1970        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 5, 1970         3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      5 P.M.
Dec. 12, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      5 P.M.
Dec. 19, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      5 P.M.
Dec. 26, 1970        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      3 P.M.
Jan. 2, 1971         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 9, 1971         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 16, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 23, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 30, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 6, 1971         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 13, 1971        Network Preemption
Feb. 20, 1971        Network Preemption
Feb. 27, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      5 P.M.
Mar. 6, 1971         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      5 P.M.
Mar. 13, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      5 P.M.
Mar. 20, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       5 P.M.
Mar. 27, 1971        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       5 P.M.
Apr. 3, 1971         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       5 P.M. 
Apr. 10, 1971        Network Preemption
Apr. 17, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Apr. 24, 1971        Network Preemption
May 1, 1971          Network Preemption
May 8, 1971          3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       5:30 P.M.
May 15, 1971         Network Preemption
May 22, 1971         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      5:30 P.M.
May 29, 1971         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)
Jun. 5, 1971         Network Preemption
Jun. 12, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jun. 19, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jun. 26, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      5:30 P.M.  
Jul. 3, 1971         Network Preemption
Jul. 10, 1971        Network Preemption
Jul. 17, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jul. 24, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jul. 31, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 7, 1971         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 14, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 21, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 28, 1971        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Sept. 4, 1971        3 4a 7 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      6 P.M.
Sept. 11, 1971       3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Sept. 18, 1971       3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Sept. 25, 1971       3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 2, 1971         3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 9, 1971         3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 16, 1971        Network Preemption
Oct. 23, 1971        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 30, 1971        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Nov. 6, 1971         3 4 4a 13        Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       3 P.M.
Nov. 13, 1971        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Nov. 20, 1971        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Nov. 27, 1971        Network Preemption
Dec. 4, 1971         3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 11, 1971        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 18, 1971        3 4a 13          Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 25, 1971        Network Preemption
Jan. 1, 1972         Network Preemption
Jan. 8, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 15, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 22, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 29, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 5, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 12, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 19, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 26, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      5 P.M.
Mar. 4, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      5 P.M.
Mar. 11, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      5 P.M.
Mar. 18, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       6 P.M.
Mar. 25, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 1, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 8, 1972         Network Preemption
Apr. 15, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 22, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 29, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       6 P.M.
May 6, 1972          Network Preemption
May 13, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       6 P.M.
May 20, 1972         Network Preemption
May 27, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      6 P.M.
Jun. 3, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      6 P.M.
Jun. 10, 1972        Network Preemption
Jun. 17, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      6 P.M.
Jun. 24, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      6 P.M.
Jul. 1, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (R)      6 P.M.
Jul. 8, 1972         Network Preemption
Jul. 15, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      5 P.M.
Jul. 22, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      6 P.M.
Jul. 29, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      6 P.M.
Aug. 5, 1972         3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 12, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 19, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Aug. 26, 1972        Network Preemption
Sept. 2, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Sept. 9, 1972        3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      6 P.M.
Sept. 16, 1972       3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Sept. 23, 1972       3 4 4a 7 13      Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Sept. 30, 1972       3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 7, 1972         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 14, 1972        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Oct. 21, 1972        Network Preemption
Oct. 28, 1972        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Nov. 4, 1972         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Nov. 11, 1972        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Nov. 18, 1972        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Nov. 25, 1972        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 2, 1972         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 9, 1972         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 16, 1972        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 23, 1972        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Dec. 30, 1972        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jan. 6, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jan. 13, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 20, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      5 P.M.
Jan. 27, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 3, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 10, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 17, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      5 P.M.
Feb. 24, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      5 P.M.
Mar. 3, 1973         Network Preemption
Mar. 10, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Mar. 17, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Mar. 24, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Mar. 31, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       5 P.M.
Apr. 7, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (R)       4:30 P.M.
Apr. 14, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       5:30 P.M.
Apr. 21, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (R)       5 P.M.
Apr. 28, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       5:30 P.M.
May 5, 1973          3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       5 P.M.
May 12, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       5 P.M.
May 19, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      5 P.M.
May 26, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jun. 2, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jun. 9, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      5 P.M.
Jun. 16, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      4:30 P.M.
Jun. 23, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Jun. 30, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (R)      5 P.M.
Jul. 7, 1973         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      5 P.M.
Jul. 14, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      4:30 P.M.
Jul. 21, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      5 P.M.
Jul. 28, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      4 P.M.
Aug. 4, 1973         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      5 P.M.
Aug. 11, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      5 P.M.
Aug. 18, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      5 P.M.
Aug. 25, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      5 P.M.
Sept. 1, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Sept. 8, 1973        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      5:30 P.M.
Sept. 15, 1973       Network Preemption
Sept. 22, 1973       3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       6 P.M. 
Sept. 29, 1973       3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       6 P.M.
Oct. 6, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (R)       6 P.M.
Oct. 13, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       3 P.M.
Oct. 20, 1973        Network Preemption
Oct. 27, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       6 P.M.
Nov. 3, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       6 P.M.
Nov. 10, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       6 P.M.
Nov. 17, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      6 P.M.
Nov. 24, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 1, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 8, 1973         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 15, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 22, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 29, 1973        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (R)      6 P.M.
Jan. 5, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      6 P.M.
Jan. 12, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      6 P.M.
Jan. 19, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      6 P.M.
Jan. 26, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      6 P.M.
Feb. 2, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      6 P.M.
Feb. 9, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      6 P.M.
Feb. 16, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      6 P.M.
Feb. 23, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      6 P.M.
Mar. 2, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      6 P.M.
Mar. 9, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      6 P.M.
Mar. 16, 1974        Network Preemption
Mar. 23, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       6 P.M.
Mar. 30, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 6, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 13, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 20, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 27, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       6 P.M.
May 4, 1974          3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       6 P.M.
May 11, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       6 P.M.
May 18, 1974         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      5 P.M.
May 25, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      6 P.M.
Jun. 1, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      6 P.M.
Jun. 8, 1974         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      5 P.M.
Jun. 15, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      4:30 P.M.
Jun. 22, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      6 P.M.
Jun. 29, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (R)      4:30 P.M.
Jul. 6, 1974         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      5 P.M.
Jul. 13, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      4:30 P.M.
Jul. 20, 1974        Network Preemption
Jul. 27, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      4 P.M.
Aug. 3, 1974         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      6 P.M.
Aug. 10, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      5 P.M.
Aug. 17, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      6 P.M.
Aug. 24, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      6 P.M.
Aug. 31, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      6 P.M.
Sept. 7, 1974        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      6 P.M.
Sept. 14, 1974       3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       6 P.M.
Sept. 21, 1974       3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       6 P.M.
Sept. 28, 1974       3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       6 P.M.
Oct. 5, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (R)       6 P.M.
Oct. 12, 1974        Network Preemption
Oct. 19, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (R)       6 P.M.
Oct. 26, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       6 P.M.
Nov. 2, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       6 P.M.
Nov. 9, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       6 P.M.
Nov. 16, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      6 P.M.
Nov. 23, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      6 P.M.
Nov. 30, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 7, 1974         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 14, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 21, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      6 P.M.
Dec. 28, 1974        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (R)      6 P.M.
Jan. 4, 1975         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      6 P.M.
Jan. 11, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      6 P.M.
Jan. 18, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      6 P.M.
Jan. 25, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      6 P.M.
Feb. 1, 1975         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      6 P.M.
Feb. 8, 1975         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      6 P.M.
Feb. 15, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      6 P.M.
Feb. 22, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 10 (R)      6 P.M.
Mar. 1, 1975         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      6 P.M.
Mar. 8, 1975         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 26 (R)      6 P.M.
Mar. 15, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 1 (R)       6 P.M.
Mar. 22, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 2 (R)       6 P.M.
Mar. 29, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 3 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 5, 1975         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 4 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 12, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 5 (R)       6 P.M.
Apr. 19, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 6 (R)       4:30 P.M.
Apr. 26, 1975        3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 7 (R)       6 P.M.
May 3, 1975          3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 8 (R)       6 P.M.
May 10, 1975         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 9 (R)       6 P.M.
May 17, 1975         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      5 P.M.
May 24, 1975         3 5 7 13         Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 11 (R)      6 P.M.
May 31, 1975         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 12 (R)      6 P.M.
Jun. 7, 1975         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 13 (R)      5 P.M.
Jun. 14, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 14 (R)      6 P.M.
Jun. 21, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 15 (R)      4 P.M.
Jun. 28, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 16 (R)      4:30 P.M.
Jul. 5, 1975         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 17 (R)      4:30 P.M.
Jul. 12, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 18 (R)      4 P.M.
Jul. 19, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 19 (R)      6 P.M.
Jul. 26, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 20 (R)      4 P.M.
Aug. 2, 1975         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 21 (R)      6 P.M.
Aug. 9, 1975         3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 22 (R)      4:30 P.M.
Aug. 16, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 23 (R)      6 P.M.
Aug. 23, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 24 (R)      6 P.M.
Aug. 30, 1975        3 4 5 7 13       Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour # 25 (R)      6 P.M.

A comic book 1968 CBS promotional advertisement for The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, the relative sizes of Warner Brothers cartoon characters therein being somewhat less than fully accurate.

On CBS, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, having premiered on September 14, 1968, ran for 3 seasons until September 4, 1971. Then, starting on September 11, 1971, CBS aired a half-hour Bugs Bunny Show (not the 1960-2 version, though quite close to it in format) until September 1, 1973. Next, ABC gained possession of this half-hour Bugs Bunny Show on September 8, 1973 and ran it for 2 years until August 30, 1975. The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour returned on CBS on September 13, 1975.


Some of the cartoons seen on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour in its 1975-6 season were "A Star is Bored", with Daffy Duck coveting Bugs Bunny's good fortune and fame, "The Abominable Snow Rabbit", with Bugs and Daffy in the Himalayas Mountains, "Rabbit's Feat", with Bugs outwitting Wile E. Coyote with sudden, startling yells and strange statements and an ability to not be where his pursuer expects him to be, and "Robin Hood Daffy", with Daffy fallibly endeavoring to be Robin Hood of Sherwood Forest, much to the amusement and laughter of Porky Pig as Friar Tuck.

The 1975-6 season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour on CBS contained several cartoons that were not in the initial, 1968-9 season. "A Star is Bored", "The Abominable Snow Rabbit", "Rabbit's Feat", "The Million-Hare", "Robin Hood Daffy", "Quackodile Tears" (without a title card), "Aqua Duck", "Cats A-Weigh", "Lighthouse Mouse", "Hoppy Go Lucky", "Hippety Hopper", "Satan's Waitin'", "Birds Anonymous", "Canned Feud", and "A Mouse Divided" all appeared on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour on CBS in the mid-1970s.

The first cartoon and last cartoon in the episodes of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour on CBS in 1975-6, was a cartoon with Bugs Bunny, and a Road Runner cartoon was usually first featured cartoon in Part 2.


Title cards for "Claws For Alarm" and "Rabbit's Feat", which were two of the seven cartoons in the February 21, 1976 episode of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, and the Warner Brothers Television logo card appearing at the end of the closing credits of that and all other Bugs Bunny/Road Runner episodes of the mid-to-late 1970s. The title card for "Claws For Alarm" hailed from the first Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour season.

Beginning in autumn of 1975, very short scenes from cartoons were used by CBS to segue to and from commercial intervals within The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour. Among the many sponsors of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner broadcasts on CBS from 1975 onward were Alpha Bits, Cap'n Crunch, and Honey-Comb breakfast cereals, McDonald's restaurants, Chips Ahoy cookies, Lifesavers candy, and Kenner Toys. Notable cartoons in the February 21, 1976 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour on CBS, which was rerun by CBS on August 21, 1976, were "Rushing Roulette", "Robot Rabbit", "Claws For Alarm", and the last cartoon feature of that episode, "Rabbit's Feat". Closing credits in the seasons of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour from 1975-6 onward started with a fade from black into a stage over which were superimposed letters in Dom Casual font, with production positions and persons specified. And the cartoon directors listed in order were Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, and Robert McKimson. Before the fade to black at end of credits sequence, Bugs and the Road Runner would be shown in still poses beside the Warner Brothers logo commonly used during the latter half of the 1970s.

In September, 1976, CBS decided to expand its coverage of Warner Brothers' classic cartoons to 90 minutes by complementing The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour with The Sylvester and Tweety Show, which aired at 9 A.M. Atlantic Time, immediately before The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour. All Tweety-and-Sylvester and most Sylvester-without-Tweety cartoons were moved from The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour to this new cartoon compilation television series, enabling The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour to add other cartoon shorts to its new season of installments. "Cheese Chasers", "To Itch His Own", "Daffy Dilly", "Fast Buck Duck", "For Scent-imental Reasons", and many other delightful cartoons were added to The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour.

Unfortunately, circa this time, CBS was under increasing pressure from animal rights groups, child psychologists, and concerned parents to reduce the amount of violence in its Saturday morning programming, and the Warner Brothers cartoons received the most attention in this regard.

By the start of the 1977-8 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner season, several cartoons had been spliced, their violent content removed, often clumsily. One memorable cut was to "Putty Tat Trouble", which, along with other Tweety cartoons, had been reincorporated into The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour after The Sylvester and Tweety Show was canceled in 1977. Scenes around the pipe where Sylvester gun-shoots a bullet through the orange cat's body and then initiates a head-clobbering fight using rifle and long-neck ashtray, were deleted by a film splice. So, the cartoon jumped abruptly from the orange cat falling down stairs in an earlier scene to Tweety running in the snow toward a mailbox, with the two cats in pursuit of him.


"Bill of Hare", "Hare We Go", and "Hare-Way to the Stars", pictured here and all of them in installment five of the first season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, were some of the mainstay cartoons on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour through the enduring television show's various permutations.

Yes, individual cartoons had been shortened, but the overall length of each Bugs Bunny/Road Runner episode was about to be increased. Part of the way into the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner 1977-8 season, there would be a change that would necessitate an adjustment to the very title of the television show.

    "The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show."
    (curtain rises)
    "Overture, curtain, lights!
    This is it. The night of nights.
    No more rehearsing or nursing a part.
    We know every part by heart!
    (cane flip)
    Overture, curtain, lights!
    This is it. We'll hit the heights!
    And oh, what heights we'll hit!
    On with the show, this is it!
    (character procession)
    Tonight what heights we'll hit!
    On with the show, this is it!"
    "Starring Bugs Bunny- and the Road Runner."
    (Road Runner zips forward on film projector screen)
    "Beep, beep!"
    "Road Runner, that Coyote's after you!
    Road Runner, if he catches you, you're through!
    Road Runner, that Coyote's after you!
    Road Runner, if he catches you, you're through!
    That Coyote is really a crazy clown!
    When will he learn that he never can slow him down?
    Poor little Road Runner never bothers anyone.
    Just running down the road is his idea of having fun!"
    "Beep, beep!"
    "The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show."

-1977-83 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show opening
Having provided to Saturday morning television beholders a sum total of 90 minutes of Warner Brothers cartoons in 1976-7, CBS, on November 19, 1977, moved back to that precedent, and Bugs and his comrades of animated cartoondom would again bask in 90 minutes of televisual glory. Rather than add another television series, CBS decided to extend the airtime for The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour. And so, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour became The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show.


In the late 1970s, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour had a change of length and of title.

Yes, in November of 1977, just a couple of months after The Sylvester and Tweety Show had been eliminated, CBS re-expanded Warner Brothers' cartoon coverage to an hour and a half. The decision to change the television program title to The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show meant that the main titles would need to be modified. New text was placed into that familiar stage light drawing to replace the word, hour, with the word, show, and the announcer changed his television show identification statement accordingly. There would now be three parts to each Bugs Bunny/Road Runner installment, with three cartoon features in parts one and three and four featured cartoons in part two. And the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour part two "stay tuned" bumper and introduction were retained for use preceding and at start of parts two and three of every episode, new text being of course positioned into the stage lights to designate part three.

The first complete season of 90-minute Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Shows was that of 1978-9. Twenty-six 90-minute installments ran from September 9, 1978 to March 3, 1979, and were repeated from March 10 to September 1, 1979. Some cartoons were shown multiple times, among them "A Pizza Tweety Pie", "Shiskabugs", and "Highway Runnery", while others appeared only once in the 26 shows. "Dumb Patrol", "False Hare", "Half Fare Hare", and "Snow Excuse" were new to CBS in the 1978-9 season.

The installment shown on December 9, 1978 and rerun on June 9, 1979, contained "Hot Cross Bunny", "Hyde and Go Tweet", "To Beep or Not to Beep", "Piker's Peak", "D' Fightin' Ones", "Tweety's S.O.S.", and "A Bird in a Bonnet", among others. On February 10 and August 11, 1979 was an installment with "Hare Trimmed", "Mother Was a Rooster", "Nuts and Volts", "Prince Varmint", and "Satan's Waitin'", among others. Also memorable was "Barbary Coast Bunny" and "Cheese Chasers" being in the episode shown on September 23, 1978 and repeated on March 24, 1979. "A Witch's Tangled Hare" was the concluding cartoon of Show 13 on December 2, 1978 and June 2, 1979. An installment that ran on January 27 and July 28, 1979 contained "Rabbit Romeo", "Fish and Slips" (with a Sylvester-and-Tweety title card), "Out and Out Rout", "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide", and "Road Runner A-Go-Go", among others.

Curiously, most of the Foghorn Leghorn cartoon shorts that had been on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour vanished at this point in time. For several years, "Mother Was a Rooster", "Little Boy Boo", and "Weasel While You Work" were the only Foghorn Leghorn cartoons to be seen on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show, and with "Mother Was a Rooster" and "Little Boy Boo" both having a new title card with Foghorn Leghorn appearing to be dancing beside cartoon title. "The Dixie Fryer" was to never again appear on CBS, and it would not be until the 1982-3 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner season that "The Foghorn Leghorn", "The Leghorn Blows at Midnight", "Strangled Eggs", "A Fractured Leghorn", "Hen House Henery", and "The Slick Chick" would be seen again with Bugs and the Road Runner on Saturday morning.

Also gone from Bugs Bunny/Road Runner seasons of the late 1970s and the early-to-mid-1980s were "Big House Bunny", "Horse Hare", and "Bugsy and Mugsy", probably for censorship as scenes in those cartoons involving violence could not be cut without eliminating those sections of the cartoons that were essential to climactic story development. Or there were so many violent acts in them that to remove them all would result in a cartoon so truncated that it would be finished in three minutes or less- in addition to making little sense to the viewer. Better to just not show those cartoons at all, Bugs Bunny/Road Runner production teams likely thought.

A further cartoon no longer featured was "Greedy For Tweety". Perhaps the hospital setting in that cartoon was considered too potentially unnerving for young viewers. Especially for those young viewers who were going to be hospitalized. A clip from the start of "Greedy For Tweety" was used, however, as a between-cartoon time-filler.


"The Iceman Ducketh", "Aqua Duck", and "Satan's Waitin'" were some of the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner-featured cartoons of the mid-to-late-1970s to lack character poses in their title card.

By the 1978-9 season, most cartoons that appeared on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show for the very first time were not assigned a title card comparable with those of the more established cartoons on the television show. No character poses accompanied titles for several new-to-Saturday-morning cartoons. Instead, the titles were printed on an otherwise blank background that was colored brown, orange-brown, blue, or rusty red. "The Rebel Without Claws", "False Hare", "The Iceman Ducketh", "Half Fare Hare", "Dumb Patrol", and "Prince Varmint" (which was originally titled "Prince Violent" when released theatrically in 1961) were all given a Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show title card devoid of character poses. Other cartoons that had their first Bugs Bunny/Road Runner appearance in 1975-6 did at that time also not have any character poses in their titles, among them "A Star is Bored", "Aqua Duck", and "Satan's Waitin'".

When, exactly, was the title of "Prince Violent" changed to "Prince Varmint"? Difficult to say. It was not a newcomer to the television show in 1978. It had been aired in 1968 in episode 4 of the initial season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour. Considering that its title card (as "Prince Varmint") for The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show in 1979 was on blank, colored background, like those of other cartoons added to the show's selections as late as 1978, its title was probably changed from "Prince Violent" to "Prince Varmint" sometime in the late 1970s. This would have coincided with other editorial changes to cartoons to reduce violent content, a policy which began at CBS sometime around 1977.

Also worth noting was the inexplicable changing of title cards of certain cartoons which had been running on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour since 1968, not to alter the spellings of the titles, but to change the poses of the characters. In the 1968-9 season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, "Tweet and Sour" and "Hyde and Go Tweet" were titled with a behind-a-tree Sylvester eyeing a fleeing Tweety. However, when these two cartoons were seen in the 1978-9 season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show, they were titled on a red background, with Sylvester posing to the left of the title and looking amicably ahead to the camera (in the same way as in the title cards for several of his cartoons without Tweety), while Tweety was situated on the lower-right part of the screen, facing the camera but glancing warily at Sylvester.

Music accompanying cartoon title cards had altered from the days of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, with the phrase first used on The Road Runner Show and then on the initial season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour for select Tweetys, Road Runners, and cartoons titled with the group pose of Fudd, Sam, Speedy, Pepe, and Foghorn, dropped and replaced with an extension of the standard Bugs Bunny cartoon title music from The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour, which was, from 1975 to 1984, used for all but an occasional Bugs Bunny cartoon short which retained its initial Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour title tune.


The Tasmanian Devil ferociously bellows to menace Bugs and the audience amid a forest stage backdrop in a Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour pre-cartoon segement.

Stage Scene Transcripts

The following are transcripts of various pre-cartoon or between-cartoon scenes on stage originally produced for The Bugs Bunny Show and recycled on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour and/or on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show, with some trimming in some cases. To make the transcripts as readable as possible, speech impediments such as Sylvester's lisp and Tweety's baby-like slurring and dialects like Bugs' Brooklyn-eese are not emphasized. However, Porky Pig's stutter and Foghorn Leghorn's Southern accent (essential to their humor) are incorporated into their transcribed dialogue.

Daffy Meets Taz On Stage

BUGS (gesticulating with his cane in one of his hands): "And introducing our host for the evening, that lovable, friendly, and talented personality. Your friend and mine, (puts cane on floor) Daffy Duck. (points cane to stage left, and Daffy is nowhere to be seen) "A-heh-heh! A-heh-heh! There seems to be a little mix-up. If you'll excuse me, I'll go see what's keeping him. (reaches upward to pull a motion picture screen to stage level) Meanwhile, you can take a look at this."

BUGS (knocking on the door to Daffy's dressing room): "Daffy, hurry up! You're on!"
DAFFY (from inside the dressing room): "Okay, okay. I'm coming. (Bugs walks away and Daffy exits dressing room, which is really a cramped broom closet, and Daffy struggles to shut door to keep brooms and other cleaning contents of closet from falling out of it- and he succeeds in closing door, with the star bearing his name on door tumbling to stage floor and revealing 'broom closet' designation on door; Daffy lifts fallen star and repositions it on the door) Some dressing room for a big star like me. (brushes dust off of emcee 'suit') It's so small, I have to go outside to change my mind. (begins to walk in direction of stage and collides with a large crate on floor) Oop! Hey, what's this? (reads the message on the crate) Danger!!! Tasmanian Devil!! Eats aardvarks, armadillos, bears, boars, cats, bats, dawgs, hawgs, stoats, goats, yaks, and old gnus, but prefers ducks?!!"
(Taz breaks out of side of crate and does his usual destructive spin, shearing through tree backdrops and reducing to a statue of a wooden Indian holding cigars to its underwear, and the Indian statue shows embarrassment)
DAFFY (standing in front of a mirror, adjusting hat, and seeing the rampaging Taz): "Yipe!" (Taz pursues Daffy)
BUGS (on stage and in a shrugging pose): "Gosh, folks. I'm sorry for the delay. Daffy should be out any minute now."
DAFFY (running past Bugs with spinning Devil close behind him): "Quick, Bugsy-boy. Do something quick! Hey-hey! Quick!"
BUGS (observing Taz's chase of Daffy and using cane to pull motion picture screen to stage level): "Heh, maybe this'll stop him." (Taz stops spinning and regards the screen while camera pulls into it)

Foghorn's Magic Trick

(Henery Hawk enters Bugs Bunny Show studio through rear exit door and by hopping ascends three stair steps)
HENERY (sniffing): "I smell chicken. I'm a chicken hawk, and I gotta have chicken." (continues sniffing while walking to camera's left)
FOGHORN (standing on stage): "With a little encouragement, Ah could be persuaded to sing a song. Heh-heh. Southern style, of course. (Foghorn discovers that he is moving not of his own volition and looks downward to see Henery pulling his foot) Hey, boy, what you trying to prove?"
HENERY (pointing at Foghorn): "You're a chicken, and I'm a chicken hawk. (grabs the bowing Foghorn's giblets) Are you coming quietly, or do I have to muss you up?"
FOGHORN (breaks Henery's grip and carries the chicken hawk in hand): "Oh, come now, boy. You've been reading too many dime novels. (drops Henery inside of a top hat atop a stage table adorned with an afghan bearing the name of the Great Houdini, rotates a wand above the hat, and tips hat with taps of the wand to show that Henery has disappeared) Now, that's what Ah call a real gone kid! Ah think Ah'll take advantage of this peace and quiet to watch an interview (adjusts a knob to activate a large television set) with Bugs Bunny." (camera pulls into television screen)

Foghorn and Miss Prissy

BUGS: "And now, I'd like to introduce the gentleman who will, in turn, introduce our guest emcee, (points cane in right direction) Mr. Foghorn Leghorn."
FOGHORN: "Well, now, thanks, Ah say, thanks loads, Mister Rabbit. Ah'm privileged, Ah say, Ah'm privileged tonight to introduce our first all-lady mistress of ceremonies. That flower of Southern poultry-hood, Miss Prissington Buff-Orpington Coach-in-China Pullet the Third, affectionately known as Miss Prissy. (gestures to stage right, where an empty chicken coop is situated, and Miss Prissy is absent) Miss Prissy, that is. (still no sign of the hen, and Foghorn walks toward the coop) Miss Prissy, Ah say Miss Prissy, are you there?"
MISS PRISSY (standing behind Foghorn at stage left, and the camera pans over to her): "Yeeeessss!"
FOGHORN (walking in direction of Prissy): "Miss Prissy here is the greatest talent to ever trod the American boards. A veritable Sarah Bernhardt of chickendom, aren't you, Miss Prissy?"
MISS PRISSY (affectionately eying Foghorn): "Yeeeessss!"
FOGHORN: "And what you're going to say is that you'd like to see your favorite screen star in a dramatic role, right?"
MISS PRISSY (fluttering her eyelids at Foghorn): "Yeeeessss!"

Daffy and the Sheepdog

DAFFY (wearing a rabbit suit to look somewhat like Bugs): "Now? Hmm? Yes? Now? Okay? Now?"
BUGS (off stage to the left, gesturing with his cane): "You're on. It's all yours."
DAFFY (bites carrot and chews a la Bugs): "Tonight, folks, we are inaugurating a new policy. I personally will do most of the entertaining since I personally have most of the talent."
SHEEPDOG (off stage to the right, with lights and a stage door sign behind him): "Rolf, rolf, reef, rolf, rolf, ralf, rolf, rolf. (moves in circles) Which way did he go? Which way did he go? Where's the little bunny-rabbit I saw on TV last week? Hmm? Hmm? Which way did he go? I have to catch him. (stops his circling and looks at camera) Actually, I am a sheepdog by trade, but this is my day off."
DAFFY: "Now, folks--"
SHEEPDOG (pounces and jumps on top of Daffy): "At last. At last. I have caught a bunny-rabbit."
DAFFY (pushing sheepdog off of him and standing): "Just a cotton-tailed minute, Rover. I am not no bunny-rabbit. (rubs dog hair off of his bunny costume) I am a duck."
SHEEPDOG: "A duck?"
DAFFY: "Yes, a duck."
SHEEPDOG (suddenly advances to be literally nose-to-eye with Daffy): "All right, if you are a duck, how come you have long ears?"
DAFFY (stepping backward from sheepdog and trying to conceal the conspicuous rabbit ears of his bunny costume): "Well, I, ah. It's, ah, well, it's, it's simple. You see, ah, well. That's, that's easy to explain. I--"
BUGS (at left corner of stage next to a "nature study" sign): "While he's explaining, let's take a trip with Sylvester."

Introducing "The Rabbit of Seville"

BUGS: "Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Tonight, we thought we would go in for a little fast culture. (ordinary stage backdrop lifts to reveal a 'Barber of Seville' set) So, without further adieu, it is my great privilege and pleasure to bring you, in its entirety, the great opera, 'The Barber of Seville', by Gio-Gino-Antonio-Dante-Alberto-D'Nunzio-Pasta-Fazool-o-Rossini."

Tune Tussle: Bugs and Yosemite Sam

BUGS (holding a guitar): "And now, folks, I will do an imitation of Frankie doing an imitation of Rickie imitating Elvis. (starts playing guitar and dancing by rapidly bending and unbending legs) Gee Whiz Willigans. Golly-gee. I love my gir-r-r-l, and she loves me. (flutters eyebrows suggestively at camera) Is my baby sweet? Sugar, candy, apple pie. When the two of us meet, oooh, yeah, I decide! (widens eyes for emphasis) Gee Whiz Willigans. Golly-gee. She's the prettiest thing you see. Gee Whiz Willigans. Golly-gee. Oh, I love my gir-r-r-l, and she loves me. And she loves me. And she loves me. (Yosemite Sam, in white pajamas and slippers, runs from his domicile adjacent to the studio of The Bugs Bunny Show, enters studio, and confronts Bugs on stage) And she loves me."
YOSEMITE SAM: "Can't ya see I'm trying to sleep?! (grabs guitar from Bugs) Give me that instrument, ya buck-toothed varmint!" (pulls and tears strings from the guitar while mumbling incoherently against Bugs' musical sense, then hands Bugs the wrecked instrument and walks off stage)

YOSEMITE SAM (after storming into the studio with his rifle in hand and twisting a miniature- capped Bugs' next musical device, a trumpet, into knots): "Here. (hands to Bugs the knotted trumpet) Now, if I hear just one peep, one little freep, I'll blast ya." (Bugs scratches his head while examining the damage to his trumpet, and Sam departs, uttering unintelligible curses)
BUGS (twirling his finger): "Ah, let's see now. The middle valve goes down, and the music goes round and round, and it comes out here. (points at rim of trumpet horn, then looks at camera) You know, folks, it may take awhile to figure this out. So, in the meantime, what do you say we look in on a real cool cat named Sylvester?"

Bugs' Demonstration of Animated Cartoon Physics

BUGS: "Eh, good evening, ladies and gentlemen. (camera pulls into a shot of Bugs from waist upward and stage lights dim, with Bugs handling carrot as though it were a cigar, dropping from its tip the equivalent of cigar ashes, and putting it into a pocket-like compartment on his grey 'coat') Tonight is 'Reading Out Loud Night'. (walks to stage right) Ah, let's see now. (motions toward a series of book shelves) Ah, which one of our favorite stories shall we start with? (peruses the spined titles) Well, ah, let's see now. Ah. Yep. Here's a nice one. (pulls a red book from one of the shelves) Now, if we could have an appropriate setting-- (a backdrop with trees and bushes emerges from stage top and fills stage from ceiling to floor; Bugs walks into it as everything in the backdrop assumes three-dimensional proportions, then looks backward toward the audience) Amazing isn't it? Walking right into a backdrop? (turns body totally in direction of audience) But shucks. (places book under his right arm and walks to stage right) You can get away with nearly anything-- in an animated cartoon. (walks partly up a tree trunk and stands sideways without difficulty) See. (continues ascending tree and stands upside down underneath branch) You can even defy the law of gravity. (falls to 'ground' of backdrop) Um, unfortunately, I, ah, never studied law. (rises to standing position and rubs head) Like I said, you can get away with nearly anything-- in an animated cartoon. For instance, you don't have to walk out of a scene. You zip out. Like so. (dashes rightward out of camera's shot) Then zip back in again. (reappears in shot equally as quick) After which, you vibrate to a stop. Like so. (raises left leg and descends it to hit right leg to induce a quiver) Now, actually, if you study it in slow-motion, you can see what actually happens on one of those zips. Slow motion, please, Fred. Thhhaaaaankkkkkssssss. (does the rightward dash in an exaggerated series of running starts and very slowly moves to right beyond camera) You see? The zip is quicker than they eye. Now, we'll run through it again at a normal speed so you can do it too. Ready? (on doing same dash, Bugs is heard to collide with something, and camera pans right to reveal that Bugs ran directly into the tree trunk) It's surprising how hard these cartoon trees are. (retrieves book from 'ground', to where it fell with Bugs during the faltered gravity-defiance demonstration) Well, maybe we'd better get back to business. (resumes walk into backdrop) Ah, let's see now. Where were we?" (commences reading book)

Bugs and the Dancing Pens

BUGS (shown in shadow): "Oh, Penbroke, Penelope. On stage, please. (two pens come onto stage and dance like figure skaters horizontally from left to right on stage floor with theatrical spotlight on them and following their left-to-right movement; both pens leave an ink line trail behind them as they move) Mmm. You two are really making your mark on show business. (pens write 'What's up, Doc?' on stage floor, with those words under theatrical spotlight) Um, snappy penmanship, but, uh, aren't you lifting somebody's line? (pens pull the words off of stage floor) You know what's on the program. Give it to us the way you did at rehearsal. (words form a rope, and pens turn rope into a lasso which they spin) They really are an imprompt-two. Ahem. Penelope. Penbroke. Penbroke!!! (pens fall to floor) This is not the Pen-Dalton Round-Up. Now, stick to the script and introduce the first feature."

Daffy's Overdue Introduction

(Bugs and Daffy are on stage, with Daffy looking annoyed)
BUGS (bowing and removing and re-donning hat): "Ladies and gentlemen, I want you to know how grateful I am for the kindness you have extended to our little show. And tonight we-- (Daffy taps Bugs on shoulder) Yes?"
DAFFY: "The name is Daffy Duck. D A double-F Y D U C uck. I, too, am a member of this little company. For weeks now, you have deliberately avoided introducing me. (raises voice) There are legalities involved here. I'll sue! So help me, I'll sue!!"
BUGS: "Yeah, yeah. All right. All right. Ahem. (removes hat) Ladies and gentlemen, it is my privilege at this time to right a great wrong (Daffy raises top of his hat with his finger in anticipation of an introduction) by introducing the most neglected yet the most delightful, lovablist, kindest-to-his-motherist person on this show. (Daffy removes hat and prepares to bow) Our sponsor." (Daffy drops hat in shock)

Sylvester and Son On Stage

BUGS: "And now, your host for the evening, Sylvester Cat."
SYLVESTER: "Thank-you, br'er rabbit! It is an honor to be your emcee for tonight. I consider it a privilege, and-- (interrupted by clapping by Sylvester Jr., who is seated atop a crate to the left of the stage) Sssssh, Junior. Sssssh. (Sylvester Jr. does not stop applauding) Shut up and stop that clapping!"
SYLVESTER JR.: "Yes, father."
SYLVESTER (to audience): "Please excuse his enthusiasm. But, ah, you know how kids are. (nervously fidgets with his bow-tie) A-ha-ha!"
SYLVESTER JR. (to himself): "My father. (sighs) World's greatest mouser. He never fails to get his mouse. (crate bounces beneath Sylvester Jr., and the kitten looks inside a hole of the crate and sees the crate's content- Hippety Hopper) Good heavens! It's the world's largest mouse!"

Rocky and Mugsy's Intrusion

BUGS: "Ladies and gentlemen. Our guest star hasn't shown up yet. So, (pulls a film projector into frame) perhaps we can entertain ourselves with a short movie."
ROCKY (pointing pistol at Bugs): "Okay, rabbit. Grab a cloud. This is a stick-up."
MUGSY (also pointing his pistol at Bugs): "Yeah, a stick-up." (his gun thrusts into Rocky's hat)
ROCKY: "Back up, Mugsy."
MUGSY (complying with Rocky's directive): "Duh, sorry, boss."
BUGS: "Eh, what's up, Doc?"
ROCKY: "Get lost, rabbit. We're takin' over."
BUGS: "But I--"
MUGSY (escorting Bugs off stage at gunpoint): "Duh, you heard the boss. When he says, 'Get lost,' he means get lost."
ROCKY (pointing his pistol ahead at television screen): "Okay, youse mugs in the audience. Get set for some real entertainment. (twirls his gun) Pipe the fancy shootin'. (his gun fires a bullet through his hat, causing the hat to deflate and sag over his head, blocking his vision) Well, as long as the lights is out, we'd just as well see what is it on the projector." (starts projector, and camera pans to a film screen)

Bugs Mediates With Mac and Tosh

(Gophers walk onto stage in procession, then stop)
GOPHER 1: "I'm so sorry. I was completely out of step."
GOPHER 2: "Oh, no, no, no. You must be mistaken. You were in perfect synchronization. It must have been me!"
GOPHER 1: "Ridiculous! Your sense of rhythm is superb! I am the guilty party in this case."
GOPHER 2: "I am sorry, but I cannot let you take the blame for some wrong I am responsible for. No. No. No."
BUGS (standing at left side of stage): "This week, we have brought to you- at very little expense- two personalities from the motion picture screen. Mac and Tosh, the Gopher Twins."
GOPHER 1: "I don't want to appear to be stubborn about this, but you were in step!"
GOPHER 2: "As much as I would like to agree with you, I just can't accept that! I have to live with myself, you know."
BUGS: "Hey, ah, fellas, listen, we've got a show to do!"
GOPHER 1: "I'm sorry, Mr. Bunny, but we have a difference of opinion we would like to settle. Would you mind going on with something else until we get this ironed out?"
GOPHER 2: "Yes, would you mind terribly, old boy?"
BUGS: "Well, we hadn't planned it, but--"
GOPHER 1: "Thank-you. That was very kind of him, wasn't it?"
GOPHER 2: "Yes, very kind indeed."
GOPHER 1: "Shall we proceed?"
GOPHER 2: "Yes, I think we should."

(Gopher 1 stands on top of Gopher 2)
GOPHER 2: "Then it's all settled. You announce the first attraction."
GOPHER 2: "But, but, I just realized we just saw the first attraction."
GOPHER 1: "So, now it's your turn."
GOPHER 2: "Oh, no, no, no, no. You missed your turn. It's only right that you announce this one."
GOPHER 1: "Oh, but I couldn't be so selfish. I insist that you announce this one."
GOPHER 2: "I beg if you don't insist."
(laying on the floor with his upper body propped by a chair, Bugs is resting his head on his hand, clearly bored by the Goofy Gophers' modest haranguing)
GOPHER 1: "Very well. I won't insist, but why don't we watch the second attraction while we decide who's announcing?"
GOPHER 2: "Peachy! Perfectly peachy!"
GOPHER 1: "Do you really think so?"
GOPHER 2: "Oh, I do! I really do! Splendidly peachy!"

Bugs' Dog Lecture

ANNOUNCER: "And now, that Oscar-winning rabbit, Bugs Bunny."
(Bugs rises to stage floor level from beneath via hole-shaped elevator)
BUGS (putting his carrot in a cigarette holder): "Good evening, folks. As everyone knows, a rabbit's best friend is his carrot. Steadfast, lovable, uncomplaining, trustworthy, (does a Boy Scout pledge gesture) loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and benevolent. The carrot is a living doll. (kisses it then places it inside a genie's-bottle-shaped flowerpot) Now, you just wait there, little one. Don't go away. I'll be back for you right after the show. (raises a pointer and moves to stand in front of a slide-projector screen) Now, the subject of tonight's lecture is man's best friend, the tarantula. (picture on screen is of a caricatured spider) Ahem. A new projectionist, I hope. Ahem. The subject of tonight's lecture is-- man's best friend. (a Whistler's Mother portrait replaces the tarantula) Oh, he's a good one! But if you think I'm going to get into an argument over the sanctity of American motherhood, you are quite mistaken. Ladies and gentlemen, the subject of tonight's lecture is man's best-- animal-- friend, the dog. (projectionist selects a picture of a wiener) The domestic dog! (wiener in an apron is shown) How can such a simple subject become so complicated? Look, Mr. Projectionist, just for the sake of getting this show on the road, could we have a picture of a sheepdog? (a mongrel with a $1.35 price tag appears on screen) Hey, friend, I said sheepdog, not cheap dog!!! (projectionist finally chooses a correct image, that of Sam Sheepdog) Hey, what happened up there? We got the right slide. Now, we bring you the true-life, dramatic struggle between a sheepdog and his fierce and ruthless enemy, the wolf."

BUGS (with a moving shot of a dog scratching its carcass): "Actually, the dog has very few natural enemies, and of those, there is only one that gives him serious trouble- the cat. But in certain cases, the cat can also be a good friend to the dog."

Bugs' Bird Lecture

BUGS: "Tonight, we have prepared a special show in behalf of the bird-lovers of America. I think that would take in just about anyone, for who doesn't love birds? (gestures to a film screen where images of various birds appear) First, the robin red-breast. Always a welcome bird as he exemplifies spring. The following is one I think you are familiar with. The bluebeard. (a bird with a long, blue beard is shown) Oh! Heh-heh-heh! I mean bluebird."
BLUEBIRD (sings the blues): "Am I blue? Am I blue? Are these tears in these eyes telling you?"
BUGS: "The meadowlark is followed closely by the blue jay. (a blue-colored, capital letter 'J' is displayed, to Bugs' obvious annoyance) Jay bird, that is. (picture of blue jay replaces the alphabetical 'J') Yeah, that's better. This is the vulture, a bird even bird-lovers dislike. Did you ever see anything uglier or more repulsive?"
VULTURE: "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt me. (sticks his tongue scornfully at Bugs) Neah!"
BUGS: "If you will cast your eyes to my right, you will observe a species of bird known as the mockingbird."
MOCKINGBIRD: "You will observe a species known as the mockingbird."
BUGS: "Dry up, buster. We're on the air."
MOCKINGBIRD: "Dry up, buster. We're on the air."
BUGS: "Heh-heh-heh! Let us continue."
MOCKINGBIRD: "Heh-heh-heh! Let us continue."
BUGS (using his carrot to hit mockingbird on head): "Shut up."
MOCKINGBIRD (violently striking Bugs on head with a mallet): "Shut up."
BUGS (rises from floor onto which he was malleted into a seated position): "How about we skip the mockingbird? Our main topic for today is the bird in his struggle for survival. We show you the Tweety bird in his natural habitat."
TWEETY (standing in the belly of a silhouetted cat): "Oops! This isn't my natural habitat. This is just to remind me to be more careful. (runs into his bird cage) This is more like it."
BUGS: "Now, with the aid and assistance of our little, feathered friend, we present a little story depicting the trials and tribulations of a domesticated bird. All ready, Tweety?"
TWEETY: "Okay, Bugsy. Let her roll."

BUGS (standing in front of a desert backdrop): "The desert is home to many interesting species of birds, like the Road Runner, often clocked at 60 miles-an-hour. Here he comes now."
ROAD RUNNER (whooshing past Bugs): "Beep, beep!"
BUGS: "And there he goes."

Banana Peel Send-Off

ANNOUNCER: "And now, that Oscar-winning rabbit, Bugs Bunny."
BUGS (pointing cane to stage right): "And co-starring George P. Dog, who will act as master of ceremonies."
BARNYARD DOG: "Thanks, Mr. Bunny. Tonight, ladies and gentlemen, we have a real Jim-dandy program for yous. So, without further adieu--"
FOGHORN (walking into camera shot and eating a banana): "A-doo-dah. A-doo-dah. Lum-dum-dum da-da-dee dum-dum. Oh-de-doo-dah-day."
BARNYARD DOG (whispering): "You're lousing up my act."
FOGHORN (dropping banana peel onto stage floor): "But Ah insist on giving you a big send-off. (places dog atop banana peel and pushes him off stage via the slippery peel) That dawg's goin' to make his mark on the world. He's got to! He can't write."

Bugs and Daffy's Sponsor Introduction

BUGS (bows): "Thank-you very much. (pulls carrot from pocket) I want to say hello to every one of you from every one of me." (Daffy, standing beside Bugs, decides to change into a rabbit costume, swiftly leaves stage, and returns so-dressed to emulate all of Bugs' dialogue and movements)
BUGS and DAFFY: "And we think we have quite a nice show. Drama, variety, (twirling carrot) and even a wonderful sponsor."

Porky and Charlie Dog

ANNOUNCER: "Starring the Oscar-winning rabbit, Bugs Bunny."
BUGS (bows): "And co-starring the famous Porky Pig." (points cane in Porky's direction)
PORKY: "L-l-ladies and g-g-gentlemen, I am to bu-bu bu-bu. I am to be-be bu-bu. I am to bu-bu bu-bu. I am to bu-be bu-be. To be or not to be. No. No. I am to be your emcee tonight, and I consider it--"
CHARLIE (from right corner of stage): "Pst. Pst. Come here."
PORKY (walking partly in Charlie's direction): "L-l-look, we're on the air. W-w-what's the big idea?"
CHARLIE: "Come here. (Porky moves closer to Charlie so that Charlie can whisper in his ear) Can you use a dog? I happen to know where you can get one cheap."
PORKY (walks back to centre stage): "We-we we-we-what? T-t-that's ridiculous. And now, l-l-ladies and gentlemen, I would like to tell you a story about a s-s-sweet, little pussycat who lived in a n-n-nice American home."

PORKY: "And n-n-now, friends, I'm going to ah--"
CHARLIE (fully on stage): "Look, bud. Don't miss this golden opportunity. I am 50 percent pointer. (points his finger in various directions) There it is. There it is. There it is. 50 percent boxer. (does some boxing moves) 50 percent setter. (sits on a stool and smokes a pipe) Irish setter. 50 percent watchdog. (pulls a pocket watch out of his waist fur) 50 percent spitz." (spits on floor of stage, inflaming Porky, who acts to remove Charlie from the stage)

PORKY (walking onto stage after supposedly disposing of Charlie): "Well, I hope I got rid of that pest."
CHARLIE (peeking from corner of stage): "But mostly I'm all Labrador retriever."
PORKY: "Oh, you are n-n-not a Labrador retriever."
CHARLIE (walking fully onto stage): "I'm not."
PORKY: "No. You are n-n-not neither no Labrador retriever."
CHARLIE: "Look, if you doubt my word, get me a Labrador, and I'll retrieve it. That's fair, isn't it?"
PORKY (befuddled): "A l-l-Labrador? W-w-well sure, I... ah... you..."
CHARLIE (using a toothpick to irreverently pick between his teeth): "Have you got a Labrador?"
PORKY: "No."
CHARLIE: "Know where you can get a Labrador?"
PORKY: "N-n-n-no."
CHARLIE: "Then shut up. (Porky, enraged and literally blowing top, grabs Charlie and starts to carry the annoying mutt permanently off stage) Hey, Bugs, this might be a good time for you to take over."
PORKY: "Y-y-yes. M-m-maybe we'd better."
BUGS (seated at his desk on stage and somewhat surprised at Charlie's suggestion): "Huh? Oh, oh, oh, yes. A funny thing happened to me on the way to the studio, eh--"

Animation Lesson Drawing Daffy

BUGS (taps his cap): "Ladies and gentlemen, tonight is a sort of an educational night. We thought you might find it informative to see how we go about drawing an animated cartoon character. Now, of all characters, a duck is the easiest to draw because a duck is almost laughably simple and stupid himself. (places cane on a hanger, sits at an animator desk situated on stage, and lifts a paintbrush) First, you draw a dumbbell. (draws a black one) Add some eyes. Eh, little, pink, sneaky ones are best. (does so) Then, a few feathers, some skinny wings, and some silly, flat feet." (Bugs has drawn Daffy minus a beak, and the Daffy figure on the animator canvass frowns and lifts a sign reading, "How about a mouth, Jack?")
BUGS: "Oh, yeah. A mouth or a bill. (adds the desired item to Daffy's profile) Ducks always have bills. A-heh-heh-heh! Delinquent bills, that is. Heh-heh-heh!"
DAFFY (after extending his tongue and licking his newly acquired beak): "All right, you two-bit Rembrandt. You've finally done it. Humiliating me in front of all of my friends. Ducks always have bills. Ho-ho. Very funny."


A scene from the Daffy Duck and Porky Pig cartoon, "Thumb Fun", was used as an interstitial, i.e. between-cartoon, element in episodes of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show.

In the mid-1970s, as The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour returned on the CBS television network and was, after a couple of seasons, expanded into the 90-minute Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show, between-cartoon stage scenes from the 1960-2 Bugs Bunny Show and between-cartoon desert vignettes from the 1966-8 Road Runner Show continued to be used as filler so that all installments were of consistent length, no matter what the varying duration of the cartoon shorts in the installments. CBS decided also to insert momentary cartoon clips between its full, and later edited, cartoon features. Many of the cartoons from which CBS extracted the clips were not themselves ever shown in any Bugs Bunny/Road Runner season. Often, if the next cartoon in an episode featured Sylvester and Tweety, a clip from another cartoon with these two characters would be seen immediately before it. The use of clips increased when cartoons became subject to edits for violence. The resultant shortness of several of the affected cartoons meant that a cartoon clip was needed to fill the time left by the edited scenes, so that each Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show's length remained consistent with that of the others.

This practice of utilizing excerpts from cartoons to fill time continued into the 1980s, long after the stage scenes from The Bugs Bunny Show had ceased to appear. ABC used cartoon clips in its Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show until 1990. The weekday Merrie Melodies, That's Warner Bros.!, and Bugs N' Daffy Show of the 1990s have all employed cartoon clips for precisely the same purpose.

Below are all of the cartoon clips that were seen between cartoon features on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show.

In a scene from "Boobs in the Woods", Daffy sings, "Some people call me Daffy".

In an excerpt from "Fool Coverage", Daffy rigs a rocking chair to tip backwards through a hole and asks Porky to try rocking in the chair.

In a scene from "Thumb Fun", Porky gives to Daffy a wrapped gift but will not let Daffy open it. Porky places the gift in the overstuffed trunk of his car, and Daffy, not bearing the suspense at not knowing what the gift is, tries to peek at the gift in the box, and when he opens the trunk, he is bombarded by luggage.

In a clip from "Tom-Tom Tomcat", one of the Indian cats shoots a plunger-tipped arrow through a hole in the fort and hits Tweety's behind. When the cat tries to pull the canary through the hole, he finds that the arrow has been attached to a black-ball bomb that explodes in his face.

An excerpt from "What's Up, Doc?" starts with Bugs saying, "Hey, look out! Stop!" Bugs and Elmer perform the song, "What's Up, Doc?".

In a scene from "Bunker Hill Bunny", (Yosemite) Sam Von Schamm the Hessian comes out of his fort, hollars, "Charge!", and runs straight into Bugs' cannon, which fires Sam back into his own fort.

In a clip from "Goldimouse and the Three Cats", Sylvester tries to teach to Sylvester Jr. how to build a mouse trap: a mallet contraption that strikes Sylvester on his head when he tries to chase Goldimouse.

In a scene from "Room and Bird", Tweety wonders what Sylvester is "up to" while the putty tat is stacking pieces of furniture. Sylvester climbs the furniture to reach Tweety's cage hung on a ceiling. He leaps on top of the cage, which falls to the floor.

In the first of two separate clips from "Bad Ol' Putty Tat", Sylvester tries to saw down Tweety's bird house and finds a rocket tied to his teeth. Tweety ignites the rocket, which pulls the teeth out of Sylvester's mouth. The other clip is Sylvester's scheme to paint his finger yellow and disguise it as a female canary to lure Tweety to a decoy nest.

In an excerpt from "Greedy For Tweety", Sylvester chases Tweety and is himself chased by a bulldog. This dual chase in a street results in the trio being hit by a car and ambulanced to hospital. The clip ends with Tweety in his hospital cage saying, "Bad ol' putty tat," to Sylvester.

In a clip from "Pappy's Puppy", Sylvester tries to rid himself of Butch J. Bulldog's scrappy little son, but Butch will not allow Sylvester to hurt the puppy.

In a scene from "Bell Hoppy", Sylvester chases Hippety Hopper in a junkyard in an attempt to put a bell around the neck of the "giant mouse".

In a clip from "Cat's Paw", bird-stalking Sylvester climbs a mountain to reach the nest of a dwarf eagle. The high-pitched cry of the eagle causes Sylvester to fall to the mountain ledge where Sylvester Jr. notes that his father is "down again". Sylvester suggests that they chase a big, slow, lethargic bird instead.

In an excerpt from "Too Hop to Handle", Sylvester Jr. pressures Sylvester to fight Hippety Hopper. Sylvester grabs the baby kangaroo by the neck, and the baby kangaroo throws Sylvester out a window. Sylvester is catapulted off of a piece of wood and into a barn, out of which he is the unwilling rider of a running, panic-stricken pig.


"Ant Pasted", with Elmer Fudd and an army of ground-dwelling insects, was part of episodes of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show from 1979 onward.

In the 1979-80 season, no memorable changes occurred in the television show's 90-minute format, and cartoons transmitted were the same as those from the previous year. But in 1980-1, CBS added to its offering a number of new-to-Bugs-Bunny/Road-Runner-Show cartoons, including "Ant Pasted" and "Good Noose".

The episode of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show airing on CBS on December 13, 1980 and again on June 13, 1981, contained the cartoons, "A Mouse Divided", "Bewitched Bunny", "Fast Buck Duck", "Mouse Wreckers", "Bedevilled Rabbit", "There They Go-Go-Go!", "Tree Cornered Tweety", and "Robot Rabbit", among others.


Promotional advertisements for the CBS Saturday morning schedule in comic books of the late 1970s and early 1980s contained some rather unorthodox drawings of some of the characters on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show.

1981-2 was the season in which CBS acquired the rights of broadcast to the late-1960s' Daffy Duck/Speedy Gonzales cartoons. NBC had previously transmitted those cartoons in its Saturday-morning Daffy Duck Show (1978-81), and the only Daffy-and-Speedy cartoon that CBS had run during that time period had been "Snow Excuse". For the 1981-2 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner season, however, CBS had obtained virtually every Daffy Duck/Speedy Gonzales cartoon! And along with those came several non-Daffy-and-Speedy cartoons that had also been in the NBC package. With the increase in the number of cartoons in its possession, CBS expanded its coverage of Warner Brothers cartoons to 2 hours, and its 90-minute Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show was now accompanied by the half-hour Sylvester & Tweety, Daffy & Speedy Show.


Title cards for some of the cartoons seen on The Sylvester & Tweety, Daffy & Speedy Show and that awhile later joined the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner fold.

The Sylvester & Tweety, Daffy & Speedy Show, or- as the CBS announcer would often call it- Sylvester & Tweety, Daffy & Speedy, consisted usually of four cartoons per episode, most often two with Sylvester and Tweety and two with Daffy and Speedy. The Tweety-and-Sylvester series of cartoons (with "The Last Hungry Cat" added, after the telecast rights to it had passed to CBS from NBC along with those of all the Daffy-and-Speedies) moved from The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show to join Daffy and Speedy in the new 26-installment television series. There would also be an occasional Sylvester-versus-Speedy cartoon (e.g. "Nuts and Volts", which came from the NBC package) or an occasional Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper cartoon (i.e. "Freudy Cat", which had also been in the NBC package) instead of a Sylvester-and-Tweety.

Meanwhile, additional cartoons appeared on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show for the first time, among them the cartoon shorts initially produced for 1979-81 prime-time television specials. Cartoon shorts such as "Soup or Sonic", "Freeze Frame", "Daffy Flies North", and "Duck Dodgers and the Return of the 24 1/2th Century".


After a temporary home on The Sylvester & Tweety, Daffy & Speedy Show, long-time Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Tweety and Sylvester cartoons, among them "Red Riding Hoodwinked", "Dog Pounded", and "Hyde and Go Tweet", returned to their traditional televisual habitat in 1982.

Two hours constituted the maximum airtime ever allotted for Saturday morning U.S. network broadcast of Warner Brothers' cartoons, and this continued for the 1982-3 season, which saw The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show expanded to two hours and split into two hour-long segments! The Sylvester & Tweety, Daffy & Speedy Show was simultaneously canceled, with most of its cartoons put back into or appearing for the first time in the more-formidable-than-ever Bugs Bunny/Road Runner juggernaut.

The first hour of the 1982-3 The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show was shown from 10:30 to 11:30 Atlantic Time, and the second hour aired from noon to 1 P.M. Atlantic Time. For starting of the second hour, there was a newfangled opening with Bugs and Daffy wearing black tuxedos and singing "This is it" on a neon-lit purple, grey-purple, sky blue, and light green stage before the procession of characters, all also wearing black tuxedos, walked across same stage. And following the announcer's introduction of Oscar-winner Bugs Bunny was a camera pan to a rectangular televisual monitor bordered by neon and more purples and grey-purples, a televisual monitor on which an all-new set of Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote cartoon clips were seen to accompany the beloved, long-established Barbara Cameron lyrics first heard in the opening to the 1966-8 Road Runner Show.


"Golden Yeggs", "Curtain Razor", "Hyde and Hare", and "Which is Witch?" were some of the cartoons featured on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show in the 1982-3 season thereof.

And that was not all. "Golden Yeggs", a cartoon that had not before been seen on CBS on Saturday morning, was included in the mix of cartoon shorts featured in 1982-3 on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show. "Curtain Razor", retitled "Show Stopper", had already been added to Bugs Bunny/Road Runner cartoon selection in the season previous and was retained for 1982-3. "Hyde and Hare" and an edited "Which is Witch?" also appeared, as too did hitherto-unfamiliar-to-Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Pepe Le Pew cartoons such as "A Scent of the Matterhorn" and "Scent-imental Romeo".

In September, 1983, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show was cut back to a 90-minute length, and there was no companion television series of the likes of The Sylvester and Tweety Show or The Sylvester & Tweety, Daffy & Speedy Show. Vaudevillian staging and dress motifs inherited from the original Bugs Bunny Show were, by this time, being jettisoned. Indeed, the stage scenes hailing from the 1960-2 Bugs Bunny Show and which had been key ingredients to Bugs Bunny/Road Runner custom since 1968, were already in the process of being dropped. And with the start of the 1983-4 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner season, the long-established "This is it" opening with Bugs and Daffy and the other characters in Vaudeville-style dress was retired and would never be seen again on Saturday morning. The "This is it" opening with neon lights and purple, grey-purple, sky blue, and light green colors and with all characters dressed in black attire, was the only one kept for use for 1983-4. That neon-lit "This is it" opening would later be incorporated into the opening of The Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show (1986-2000), specifically in that television show's third to sixth seasons inclusive.

Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show part two and part three introductions of pre-1983 style were dropped, and the end credits to each installment were printed in the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner-traditional Dom Casual font against a turquoise background with a scattered array of musical symbols. However, the title cards to a large number of the cartoon shorts were still in the 1968 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner style showing characters in their Bugs Bunny Show and Season 1 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour garments.

With reduction of airtime from two hours to 90 minutes, less cartoons could be run over a 26-week season. Thus, a number of cartoon shorts from the previous Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show season were redistributed by Warner Brothers to other markets (i.e. syndication to individual television stations). If this was not a demonstration of the CBS television network's decreasing interest in broadcasting Warner Brothers' animated cartoons, perhaps the fact now to be stated was. The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show, for many years a central part of CBS' Saturday morning line-up, was bumped by CBS' current crop of cartoon television series off of the morning schedule and moved to 12:30 P.M. Atlantic Time. Such left the television show vulnerable to preemption by network affiliate stations that often preferred to run their own programming, including college sports, at 12:30 or at 1 o'clock.

Diminishing interest on CBS' part in airing the Warner Brothers cartoons was ostensibly a result of the many years, dating back to 1968 and consecutive since 1975, of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner broadcast on that television network, and of the package of cartoons to be shown changing only somewhat peripherally from television season to television season- and of a belief, correct or no, that audiences were tiring of the Warner Brothers cartoons due to overexposure on television in a way of presentation possibly having become "old hat". With the 1982-3 season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show, there had been a modification in the look of the television show's opening sequence as has been described, evidently in an effort to convey a sense of a refreshed presentation. But such change did not seem to bring with it the resurgence in viewer enthusiasm that CBS was hoping to see, and the television network was opting to give priority in the Saturday schedule to other programming. Not a good portent for the future of Bugs and the Road Runner on Saturday A.M. CBS.


"Mouse Wreckers", "Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare", and "There They Go-Go-Go!", pictured here, were in installment thirteen of the first season of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour and would continue to be seen in all subsequent Bugs Bunny/Road Runner seasons.

Further adjustments to The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show were to come as Warner Brothers sought to regain hearty interest of viewers and of CBS.

    "It's cartoon gold, for young and old.
    It's the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show.
    The Bugs is hot. The Coyote's not.
    And Road Runner's go, go, go!
    And they go beep-beep-beep-beep-oom-bapa-mao-mao-bubba-bubba-bub-a-Bugs!    
    There's Porky Pig. 'Th-Th-Th-The name's P-Porky Pig.'
    And Daffy Duck. 'You're dispicable!'
    There's Tweety Bird. 'I tawt I taw a putty tat.'
    Bugs Bunny's luck. 'Eh, what's up, Doc?'
    And Elmer Fudd. 'Be vewy, vewy quiet.'
    Sylvester the Cat. 'Sufferin' succotash!'
    Speedy Gonzales. 'Ariba, ariba, ariba!'
    That Sam in the hat. 'It's Sam, you varmint.' 
    And they go beep-beep-beep-beep-oom-bapa-mao-mao-bubba-bubba-bub-a-Bugs!
    The famous cartoon show's the only way to go.
    It's the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show!"

-1984-5 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show opening
With a Golden Jubilee celebration of the Warner Brothers' cartoons soon to come and with the emergence of sophisticated computer graphic movement techniques, The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show underwent, in 1984, a major overhaul, changing much more profoundly than it did in 1982 and 1983. For what would be their final season (1984-5) on CBS, Warner Brothers' cartoons were presented with an entirely new, different introduction and a renovated, upgraded titling style on the 90-minute Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show, whose airtime moved ahead to a slightly more agreeable 11:30 A.M. (Atlantic).

In 1984, John Klawitter left the employ of Walt Disney Productions, where he had been working as producer of short promotional advertisement montages, on film or videotape, for movies, television programs, television specials, and whatever else of which the Walt Disney executives desired the public to be keenly aware. Klawitter, whose previous work had been in television commercials for products of the Kellogg's and Nestle companies, had pulled together teams to write and produce those Walt Disney Productions advertisement montages (for which he became known as "the trailer guy") and himself had been lyricist of several jingles and theme songs for movie and television programs of Walt Disney Productions. Almost immediately after his departure from the establishment that had spawned Mickey Mouse, Klawitter and his own production company (Happyfeets) were hired by Warner Brothers' cartoon animation division to create a newfangled opening to The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show for 1984-5. Klawitter's Warner Brothers contact was Steven S. Greene, later one of the credited producers of The Bugs Bunny/Looney Tunes Comedy Hour and The Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show. Salty Dog Studios in Van Nuys, California was to be the location where "It's Cartoon Gold", the opening song to The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show's 1984-5 season, was born, Klawitter penning the lyrics and Steve Zuckerman composing the music. Greene was rather less than enamored with "It's Cartoon Gold"; he thought it rather too "bubble-gum", of appeal mostly to pre-teenagers, not to the "older crowd" whom pre-teenagers admire and wish to be like. And thus, Greene hired another production team to work rivaling Klawitter and Happyfeets, that other production team's remit being to devise something "more hard-edge". Countless test audiences of juveniles and teenagers, to whom the two prospective new opening songs were presented, resoundingly favored "It's Cartoon Gold". No contest. A happy victory for Happyfeets.

And so, Steven S. Greene acknowledged the test audience decision and the song, "It's Cartoon Gold", was approved as the lyrical sound of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show's new opening for 1984-5. And what about the visuals?

Klawitter remembers having considerable problems in producing the visuals for the opening to the 1984-5 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show. The freelance cartoon animator whom Warner Brothers hired to work with Klawitter, did quite fancy tinkering with the Warner Brothers Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies concentric circles that were a trademark of the cartoons of Bugs Bunny, etc., and Greene was quite displeased in those cases about the results, meaning that it was back to the proverbial and the literal drawing board.


Some of the visuals that accompanied the lyrics of John Klawitter for the new "It's Cartoon Gold" opening to The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show in autumn of 1984. These visuals would be seen in the commencement of parts one, two, and three of every episode.

Work eventually came to fruition, though, and starting in the autumn of 1984, the catchy output of this superlative collaboration was seen and heard Saturday mornings to the delight of people of all ages for twelve months, in long form at start of every episode and in a shortened rendition at start of parts two and three. And with the closing credits to every installment was an instrumentals-only variation of "It's Cartoon Gold", alas seldom heard without the CBS announcer's voice drowning it out for most of its play.

The titles for the cartoon shorts in the 1984-5 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show installments became rather "busy" in their new fashion. Words would enter the screen from various directions, as did character poses, leaving a blurry trail before settling into a position comparable to that on the former, entirely stationary title cards. Not all cartoons were modified in this way. Cartoons such as "Ain't She Tweet", "Tugboat Granny", "Cats A-Weigh", "Aqua Duck", "False Hare", "The Iceman Ducketh", "The Last Hungry Cat", "Satan's Waitin'", and several of the tussles between Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales retained their pre-1984 title cards. "Tugboat Granny" was not granted a moving-graphic title until its premiere on ABC's Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show in 1987. And it was not until it was shown on Bugs Bunny & Tweety in January, 1988 that "Ain't She Tweet" attained mobile-graphic titling.

Below are images of the titling for some of the cartoons on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show in its 1984-5 season.

   
   
   

The title card for "Home Tweet Home", with Bugs and the Road Runner posed therein, was modified to this new, moving-graphic format, without a change to poses of Sylvester and Tweety. Conversely, the new titling for "A Mouse Divided" showed Sylvester and Tweety- despite the fact that Tweety never appears in the cartoon. And the new, moving-graphic titling for the Sylvester and Sylvester Jr. cartoon, "Fish and Slips", also had Sylvester and Tweety, maintaining the odd nature of the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show titling of that cartoon which had been the case with its still title card from as early as 1979. Correction would not come until its first appearance on The Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show in 1988.

The post-September, 1984, CBS film print of "Canned Feud"- a Sylvester cartoon short- had Bugs standing aside the title. "Beanstalk Bunny"'s title card had, since 1968, always had a solo pose of Daffy, and this remained true for the titling of "Beanstalk Bunny" post-September, 1984. And certain Sylvester-without-Tweety cartoons (i.e. "Birds of a Father", "Mouse-Taken Identity", "The Slap-Hoppy Mouse", "Hoppy Daze", "Dr. Jerkyl's Hide", and "Pop 'im Pop!") kept being titled with the semi-circle of the faces of Foghorn Leghorn, Pepe Le Pew, Speedy Gonzales, Yosemite Sam, and Elmer Fudd, those Sylvester-without-Tweety cartoons all having been titled with characters semi-circle still title card since they were included in episodes of The Road Runner Show and first-season Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour in the 1960s. With the new, moving-graphic titles, the five faces came into camera frame as a unified whole and settled in top half of screen while the text of the titles moved into view before settling in the bottom half of screen. Other cartoons that had long been titled with the five-character-faces semi-circle and which continued to be so-titled, moving-graphics style, included "Cannery Woe", "A Sheep in the Deep", "Woolen Under Where", and "The Wild Chase". And the Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam cartoon short, "Piker's Peak", was now titled with the five-character-faces semi-circle, it having previously been titled with Bugs and Yosemite Sam on stage beside the spotlit title.


Image of the cartoon title for "Hyde and Go Tweet" in The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show's 1984-5 season. When it had been featured in Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour first season installment 24, "Hyde and Go Tweet" had been titled with Sylvester looking from behind a tree at a running Tweety.

The cartoons in the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner installment transmitted on February 2 and August 3, 1985 were "The Hasty Hare", "Daffy's Inn Trouble", "Muzzle Tough", "Gee Whiz-z-z-z!", "Prince Varmint", "A-Haunting We Will Go", "Tweet and Sour", "Shot and Bothered", "False Hare", "Fast Buck Duck", "Hyde and Go Tweet", and "Zoom at the Top".

The December 14, 1984 and June 15, 1985 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show contained "Spaced-Out Bunny", "Fiesta Fiasco", "Freudy Cat", "Gee Whiz-z-z-z!", "Transylvania 6-5000", "Tweet and Lovely", "Muchos Locos", and "Going! Going! Gosh!", among other cartoon shorts. On December 21, 1984 and June 22, 1985, the cartoons shown on The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show included "The Windblown Hare", "A Message to Gracias", "Woolen Under Where", "The Solid Tin Coyote", "Mad as a Mars Hare", "Double or Mutton", "Cannery Woe", and "Whoa Be-Gone!". Some of the cartoons in the January 5 and July 6, 1985 episode were "Lighter Than Hare", "Mexican Mouse-Piece", "Touche and Go", "Rushing Roulette", "The Iceman Ducketh", "Weasel While You Work", "Putty Tat Trouble", and "Chaser On the Rocks".

"Frigid Hare" was one of the cartoons featured in the February 23 and August 24 installment. An unscheduled news broadcast interrupted "Gift Wrapped" on August 10, 1985. The final Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show that aired on September 7, 1985 had "Apes of Wrath", "Satan's Waitin'", "Aqua Duck", "To Beep or Not to Beep", "Beanstalk Bunny", "A Street Cat Named Sylvester", "Rodent to Stardom", "The Wild Chase", and others.

Almost every 1984-5 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner episode started with a cartoon with Bugs Bunny and ended with a Road Runner cartoon. Distinctly reminiscent of Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour- Season 1. And some of the Road Runner cartoons shown in the 1984-5 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner season were substantially shortened, "Out and Out Rout" and "Chaser On the Rocks" being two notable examples of such. "Out and Out Rout" was missing its first two gags, i.e. those involving a skateboard and a hunting bird, and "Chaser On the Rocks" was without its closing detour-into-cannon gag.

In a 1984-5 mid-season episode, "Bully For Bugs" was the first cartoon of Part Two, and it was immediately followed by "A Bird in a Guilty Cage". Both of these cartoons had been part of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour's first season in 1968-9 as first and second cartoons of Part Two in their respective episodes. The bulk of the Bugs Bunny and the Tweety and Sylvester series of cartoon shorts, including the two cartoons referenced in this paragraph, had their Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show titles rendered in 1984-5 in the then new cartoon titling format. Only the Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales cartoons were the ones most consistently still sporting their previous standard title cards. Lack of work on revamping the Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales cartoon titles was perhaps a portent of what was to become of those cartoons, i.e. that they were not long for the Saturday morning network television world.


Image of the titling for "Hare-Breadth Hurry" when that cartoon short was shown on the 1984-5 Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show.

Cartoons Shown On The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show (1984-5)

"Beanstalk Bunny" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Elmer Fudd
"Duck! Rabbit! Duck!" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Elmer Fudd
"The Rabbit of Seville" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Long-Haired Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Giovanni Jones
"A-Lad-in His Lamp" with Bugs Bunny and Smoky the Genie
"Bunker Hill Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"High Diving Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Rabbit Every Monday" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Hare-Breadth Hurry" with Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote
"From Hare to Heir" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Compressed Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote
"Hare-Less Wolf" with Bugs Bunny and Charles M. Wolf
"Piker's Peak" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"The Fair-Haired Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Hare-Way to the Stars" with Bugs Bunny and Marvin Martian
"Prince Varmint" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Knighty Knight Bugs" with Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam, and the Dragon
"Roman Legion-Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Rabbit's Feat" with Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote
"Mississippi Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Colonel Shuffle
"The Million-Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck
"Devil May Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Tasmanian Devil
"Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Tasmanian Devil
"Shiskabugs" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"To Hare is Human" with Bugs Bunny and Wile E. Coyote
"Lighter Than Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"What's Opera, Doc?" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"My Bunny Lies Over the Sea" with Bugs Bunny and Angus McCrory
"The Windblown Hare" with Bugs Bunny and the Big Bad Wolf
"Bewitched Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Witch Hazel
"This is a Life?" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, Yosemite Sam, and Granny
"Rabbit Romeo" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Wideo Wabbit" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Pre-Hysterical Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Hare We Go" with Bugs Bunny and Chris Columbus
"Robot Rabbit" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"Knights Must Fall" with Bugs Bunny and Sir Pantsalot of Dropseat Manor
"What's Up, Doc?" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"A Witch's Tangled Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Witch Hazel
"Mutiny On the Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Frigid Hare" with Bugs Bunny and the Penguin
"Bedevilled Rabbit" with Bugs Bunny and Tasmanian Devil
"Hare Trimmed" with Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam, and Granny
"Hot Cross Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and the Bespectacled Doctor
"Bugs Bonnets" with Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd
"A Star is Bored" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, and Yosemite Sam
"Dumb Patrol" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Big House Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"14 Carrot Rabbit" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Bully For Bugs" with Bugs Bunny and the Bull
"The Abominable Snow Rabbit" with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and the Abominable Snowman
"The Iceman Ducketh" with Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck
"Transylvania 6-5000" with Bugs Bunny and Count Bloodcount
"Barbary Coast Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Nasty Canasta
"Now Hare This" with Bugs Bunny and the Big Bad Wolf
"Devil's Feud Cake" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Sahara Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Wild and Woolly Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Half Fare Hare" with Bugs Bunny, Ralph Kramden, and Ed Norton
"False Hare" with Bugs Bunny and the Big Bad Wolf
"Hare-Abian Nights" with Bugs Bunny and Yosemite Sam
"Bonanza Bunny" with Bugs Bunny and Blacque Jacque Shellacque
"Wet Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Blacque Jacque Shellacque
"Bill of Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Tasmanian Devil
"Mad as a Mars Hare" with Bugs Bunny and Marvin Martian
"The Hasty Hare" with Bugs Bunny, Marvin Martian, and K-9
"Spaced-Out Bunny" with Bugs Bunny, Marvin Martian, and the Abominable Snowman
"Hillbilly Hare" with Bugs Bunny and the Martin Brothers
"Apes of Wrath" with Bugs Bunny and the Drunken Stork
"Stop, Look, and Hasten" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Ready, Set, Zoom!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Hopalong Casualty" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Going! Going! Gosh!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Scrambled Aches" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Rushing Roulette" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"The Solid Tin Coyote" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"There They Go-Go-Go!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Just Plane Beep" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Fast and Furry-ous" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Gee Whiz-z-z-z!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Tired and Feathered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Beep Prepared" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Whoa Be-Gone!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Road Runner A-Go-Go" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Lickety-Splat!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Zoom at the Top" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Freeze Frame" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Out and Out Rout" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Highway Runnery" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Sugar and Spies" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Clippety Clobbered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Chaser On the Rocks" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Hairied and Hurried" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Zip N' Snort" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Zip Zip Hooray" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Boulder Wham!" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Shot and Bothered" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"Run, Run, Sweet Road Runner" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"War and Pieces" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"To Beep or Not to Beep" with Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote
"The Wild Chase" with Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Sylvester, and Speedy Gonzales
"Nuts and Volts" with Sylvester and Speedy Gonzales
"Cannery Woe" with Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester
"Mexican Boarders" with Speedy Gonzales, Sylvester, and Slowpoke Rodriguez
"A Message to Gracias" with Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester
"Gonzales' Tamales" with Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester
"Cats and Bruises" with Sylvester and Speedy Gonzales
"The Pied Piper of Guadalupe" with Speedy Gonzales and Sylvester
"Claws in the Lease" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
"Pop 'im Pop!" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Who's Kitten Who?" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Lighthouse Mouse" with Sylvester and Hippety Hopper
"A Mouse Divided" with Sylvester and the Drunken Stork
"Hippety Hopper" with Sylvester and Hippety Hopper
"Freudy Cat" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Fish and Slips" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
"Dr. Jerkyl's Hide" with Sylvester, Spike, and Chester
"Birds of a Father" with Sylvester and Sylvester Jr.
"Hoppy Go Lucky" with Sylvester, Benny Cat, and Hippety Hopper
"Cats A-Weigh" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Tree For Two" with Sylvester, Spike, and Chester
"Mouse-Taken Identity" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Canned Feud" with Sylvester
"Kit For Cat" with Sylvester and Elmer Fudd
"Claws For Alarm" with Porky Pig and Sylvester
"D' Fightin' Ones" with Sylvester and Bulldog
"Hoppy Daze" with Sylvester and Hippety Hopper
"The Slap-Hoppy Mouse" with Sylvester, Sylvester Jr., and Hippety Hopper
"Tweet Zoo" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Trick or Tweet" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Putty Tat Trouble" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Hawaiian Aye Aye" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Sandy Claws" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"A Pizza Tweety Pie" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"The Last Hungry Cat" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Birds Anonymous" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tweety's S.O.S." with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Tugboat Granny" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Canary Row" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Fowl Weather" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and Hector Bulldog
"Tweety and the Beanstalk" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tweet, Tweet, Tweety" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Red Riding Hoodwinked" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and the Big Bad Wolf
"Dog Pounded" with Tweety and Sylvester
"The Rebel Without Claws" with Tweety and Sylvester
"The Jet Cage" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Home Tweet Home" with Tweety and Sylvester
"All Abir-r-rd" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Ain't She Tweet" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"A Bird in a Bonnet" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"A Bird in a Guilty Cage" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tweet and Sour" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Hyde and Go Tweet" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tweety's Circus" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Gift Wrapped" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Catty Cornered" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Rocky
"Snow Business" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Tree Cornered Tweety" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Satan's Waitin'" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Trip For Tat" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"Tweet and Lovely" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Tweet Dreams" with Tweety and Sylvester
"Muzzle Tough" with Tweety, Sylvester, and Granny
"A Street Cat Named Sylvester" with Tweety, Sylvester, Granny, and Hector Bulldog
"Good Noose" with Daffy Duck
"Aqua Duck" with Daffy Duck
"You Were Never Duckier" with Daffy Duck and Henery Hawk
"Quackodile Tears" with Daffy Duck
"Duck Amuck" with Daffy Duck and Bugs Bunny
"Daffy Dilly" with Daffy Duck
"Fast Buck Duck" with Daffy Duck and Bulldog
"Stupor Duck" with Daffy Duck
"Suppressed Duck" with Daffy Duck
"Tease For Two" with Daffy Duck and the Goofy Gophers
"Daffy's Inn Trouble" with Daffy Duck and Porky Pig
"Corn On the Cop" with Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, and Granny
"Duck Dodgers and the Return of the 24 1/2th Century" with Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Gossamer, and Marvin Martian
"Daffy Flies North" with Daffy Duck and the Laughing Horse
"Robin Hood Daffy" with Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd
"A Taste of Catnip" with Daffy Duck, Speedy Gonzales, and Sylvester
"It's Nice to Have a Mouse Around the House" with Daffy Duck, Sylvester, Speedy Gonzales, and Granny
"Music Mice-Tro" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Swing Ding Amigo" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Daffy's Diner" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Chili Corn Corny" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Skyscraper Caper" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Quacker Tracker" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Assault and Peppered" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Snow Excuse" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"The Spy Swatter" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Speedy Ghost to Town" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Rodent to Stardom" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Fiesta Fiasco" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Moby Duck" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"See Ya Later, Gladiator" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Feather Finger" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Daffy Rents" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Mexican Mouse-Piece" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"The Astroduck" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Go Go Amigo" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"A-Haunting We Will Go" with Daffy Duck, Speedy Gonzales, and Witch Hazel
"Muchos Locos" with Daffy Duck, Speedy Gonzales, and Porky Pig
"Go Away Stowaway" with Daffy Duck and Speedy Gonzales
"Weasel While You Work" with Foghorn Leghorn and the Weasel
"Hen House Henery" with Foghorn Leghorn and Henery Hawk
"Little Boy Boo" with Foghorn Leghorn, Miss Prissy, and Egghead Jr.
"The Slick Chick" with Foghorn Leghorn
"The Leghorn Blows at Midnight" with Foghorn Leghorn and Henery Hawk
"The Foghorn Leghorn" with Foghorn Leghorn and Henery Hawk
"Lovelorn Leghorn" with Foghorn Leghorn and Miss Prissy
"Mother Was a Rooster" with Foghorn Leghorn
"Strangled Eggs" with Foghorn Leghorn, Henery Hawk, and Miss Prissy
"A Fractured Leghorn" with Foghorn Leghorn
"The Cat's Bah" with Pepe Le Pew
"For Scent-imental Reasons" with Pepe Le Pew
"Touche and Go" with Pepe Le Pew
"A Scent of the Matterhorn" with Pepe Le Pew
"Wild Over You" with Pepe Le Pew
"Little Beau Pepe" with Pepe Le Pew
"Heaven Scent" with Pepe Le Pew
"Scent-imental Romeo" with Pepe Le Pew
"Ant Pasted" with Elmer Fudd
"What's My Lion?" with Elmer Fudd and Rocky the Mountain Lion
"A Mutt in a Rut" with Elmer Fudd and Rover the Dog
"A Sheep in the Deep" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"Double or Mutton" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"Woolen Under Where" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"Don't Give Up the Sheep" with Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog
"Terrier Stricken" with Claude Cat and Frisky Puppy
"Two's a Crowd" with Claude Cat and Frisky Puppy
"One Froggy Evening" with Michigan J. Frog
"Mouse Wreckers" with Claude Cat, Hubie, and Bertie
"To Itch His Own" with Angelo the Mighty Flea and Bulldog
"I Gopher You" with the Goofy Gophers
"Cheese it- the Cat!" with the Honey-Mousers
"Cheese Chasers" with Claude Cat, Hubie, and Bertie
"Dog Gone South" with Charlie Dog and Colonel Shuffle

And such was the hefty amount of Warner Brothers cartoons available to CBS in the months leading to the finale for Bugs and his fellows, friends, and foes on the CBS television network on A.M. Saturdays.

    "'Dis has been a Warner Brothers-Seven Arts--"
    "Beep, beep!"
    "Heh-heh-heh. Like the boid says, 'dis has been a Warner Brothers-Seven Arts television presentation."

-First season closing "remarks" by Bugs and the Road Runner
Despite the positive viewer response to the changes for Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show for 1984-5, CBS continued to lose interest in continuing to air The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show and opted in 1985 to waive the broadcast rights to the Warner Brothers cartoons. Thus, on September 7, 1985, Bugs and the Road Runner appeared for the last time in compilations of their cartoon shorts on Saturday morning on CBS. Members of the generations who watched Bugs Bunny/Road Runner telecasts on CBS in the United States and/or on CBC or Global in Canada would look fondly upon the bygone days when Bugs and the Road Runner shared billing in the title of a Saturday morning or late afternoon/early evening television attraction.



Yes, generations of people were weaned on the Warner Brothers cartoons through Bugs Bunny/Road Runner telecasts, fond memories of the distinctive flourishes of the television show melded permanently with cogent impressions of the cartoons therein. Sadly, all that exists on commercial videocassette, laser videodisc, or digital videodisc (DVD) that is unique, arguably, to The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour is the opening to episodes of the Bugs Bunny/Road Runner 1977-8 season, from around the time of the television show's expansion to 90 minutes. Possibly from the very first 90-minute episode. The announcer's identification of The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour is not entirely congruous with the words shown overlain on spotlights before "This is it" and after the Barbara Cameron-written song. He says, "...Hour," while the word on the lowermost spotlight reads "Show". This bizarre construction may be found as a bonus item within the second volume, released by Warner Home Entertainment in 2004, in the LOONEY TUNES GOLDEN COLLECTION DVD range.

IN MEMORIAM

Cartoon directors Friz Freleng, Chuck Jones, and Robert McKimson
Voice characterization performers Mel Blanc, Arthur Q. Bryan, Daws Butler, Hal Smith, and Bea Benaderet
Musicians Carl W. Stalling, Milt Franklyn, John Seely, Bill Lava, and Walter Greene
Title song writers Jerry Livingston and Mack David
Producer William L. Hendricks


CBC logo images (c) Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
All other images (c) Warner Bros.
With profound thanks to John Klawitter for information on the making of the opening to the 1984-5 season and for the "It's Cartoon Gold" original lyric sheet image
Enormous thanks also to Greg Duffell, Adel Khan, Frank Rey, and Emru Townsend for their help and support
Thanks to Emru Townsend and to Greg Duffell for information about "Hyde and Hare" and "Which is Witch?" being added to the television show in the 1980s, and to Frank Rey for some contents of episodes of the 1978-9, 1980-1, and 1984-5 seasons
Textual content (c) Kevin McCorry, with all rights reserved
This Web page, the remembered information, and the observations therein are the intellectual property of the author unless otherwise noted and may not be reproduced and then altered in any way without the express written consent of the author, and any scholarly quoting, paraphrasing, or other repetition of them MUST be accompanied by full stated credit to the author, with failure to do so possibly exposing an individual or group to litigation and possible civil or criminal penalty


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